Steel vs Aluminum Fuel Lines

Discussion in 'High Tech Retrofits' started by CDesperado, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. CDesperado

    CDesperado Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Oct 1, 2004
    Dallas Texas
    One of the guys at the shop just told me they want to use aluminum rather than steel fuel lines because it "bends easier" - but off a quick Google search I see several posts saying not to do this.

    Can anyone here provide me with more input? I may need to call the shop and put the kibosh on this idea. I asked if there was any advantage/ disadvantage and was told there isn't, but I question everything.

    I'm using an MSD Atomic EFI with a return line.

    Thanks for any input.
     
  2. John Wright

    John Wright Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Rustburg, Va
    Aluminum is lighter but heat transfers easier in aluminum than steel and it will also fatigue if used where vibrations may effect it. Not to sure about flaring aluminum lines either, looks like it would work harden and eventually leak at the flare. May want to look into this a bit further before jumping in with aluminum.
     
  3. CDesperado

    CDesperado Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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  4. BonzoHansen

    BonzoHansen Administrator Lifetime Gold Member

    IMO not on a street car. From that thread:
     
  5. Fbird

    Fbird Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    atlanta, ga
    one of the main problems people experience with aluminum lines is thier failure to properly support it. You cannot have a 3 ft span between clamps on aluminum (nor steel for that matter) but if you are swapping from 5/16 steel to 3/8 aluminum consider ADDING at least 2 MORE insulated clamps in-between each of the factory clamps. Stone shielding is obviously a beneift and DON'T USE the BATTERY CABLE as a rock gaurd for the fuel line. :confused:
     
  6. ryeguy2006a

    ryeguy2006a Veteran Member

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    Sep 29, 2009
    Upstate, NY
    What about using braided lines? I am about to run lines for my car and am going through the same dilemma and have thought about using a braided line from the tank to the fuel rail.
     
  7. CDesperado

    CDesperado Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Dallas Texas
    I've seen a little bit of information on those, but not enough to determine if that is the direction I should go. It may not be the best option for me since I'm running EFI.

    I honestly don't know what direction to go, other than that I have seen numerous forums recommending against using aluminum for street cars.
     
  8. BondoSpecial

    BondoSpecial Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Southern Maryland
    I hand bent 3/8 stainless hard line, if I can do it you can do it. Ease of bending isn't worth using a weaker metal, to me.

    I just used a cheap 3-stepped size auto parts store tubing bender - I stuck it in a pipe I stuck in the ground, and used a little jack handle to extend the handle. Worked fine. Use lubricant when bending.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2013
  9. John Wright

    John Wright Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Rustburg, Va
    It needs to be the teflon lined variety of high pressure braided hose to hold up to EFI and today's fuels....and it doesn't let the fuel smell through like the regular braided hose does.
     
  10. Protour-Camaro

    Protour-Camaro Veteran Member

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    Feb 16, 2012
    California

    You can use any Fuel Injection type of braided hose. It doesn't have to be PTFE, but like mentioned it will cut down on the gas eating through the lines. PTFE is also not very flexible and VERY expensive.

    I will tell you, even though lowest cost hose is the quickest and simple solution, but its all the most expensive!

    I highly suggest buying steel line. Only use hose from the frame to the tank and frame to the fuel rail. Never use aluminum for a street car. Rock and debri can easily puncture it and you will be having a bad day when gallons of gas goes everywhere (That's if it doesn't com bust first).
     

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