Calling all guys that part out cars....

Discussion in 'Suspension, Steering, Brake & Wheel Topics' started by KEVS79, Oct 15, 2015.

  1. KEVS79

    KEVS79 Veteran Member

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    I am going to be snagging a rear end out of a TA in a field. What is the fastest way to yank it out? I was thinking jack up the rear of the car, take a sawsall to the front and rear spring eye bolts and shocks, unbolt the sway bar from the frame and roll the whole thing out drive shaft and all. Any other suggestions?
     
  2. Dogwater

    Dogwater Veteran Member

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    I'd bring the sawall anyhow, but I'd try to unbolt first. Hose everything down with penetrating oil an beat the chit out of those bolts with a BFH then respray. Or you can cut off those big U bolts then it come right out. Might need some muscle to pull it out, weights about 80lbs without the brake calipers on it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2015
  3. Matt T

    Matt T Veteran Member

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    Fastest--cutting torch, if you can be certain there is no gas or fumes left in the tank, but I'd try to do it the right way first.
     
  4. Twisted_Metal

    Twisted_Metal Administrator Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Cutting eye bolts will be a PITA! Avoid if possible.

    If the car can be lifted and supported by the rear frame... You can pull the rear out through the leafs from one side.

    Bolts, shocks, e-brake and brake lines is all you have to deal with that way.
     
  5. KEVS79

    KEVS79 Veteran Member

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    Yep, might be easier to just unbolt than mess with cutting that's for sure. But will have the sawsall on hand just in case. I don't have access to a cutting torch unfortunately.
     
  6. Skip Fix

    Skip Fix Veteran Member

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    Save the sway bar and brackets for it also.
     
  7. KEVS79

    KEVS79 Veteran Member

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    I was going to grab the front bar also if it is the thick ws6 bar. Of course will get all the disc brake related stuff also.
     
  8. Gary S

    Gary S Administrator Lifetime Gold Member

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    Unbolting the springs at the axle is easier than cutting the springs. Likewise, it is easier to unbolt the swaybar than it is to try to cut it loose. The only thing I cut is the rubber brake line, and the front parking brake cable. Save the rear ones.
     
  9. 351maverick

    351maverick Veteran Member

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    unbolting? what is that? LOL

    cut off wheel on a 4 1/2" angle grinder...

    cut the two bottom shock bolts

    sawzall (with a good, new blade or two) the ends of the leaf springs & slide that mother out

    I do not like to be underneath a junk car like that more than I have to
     
  10. Protour-Camaro

    Protour-Camaro Veteran Member

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    What, are you stealing it? What's the hurry? I suggest you just un bolt it. If all you want is the rear (No springs), its shouldn't be tough to remove it.
     

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