Engine bay airflow

Discussion in 'Camaro Questions' started by Thomas Mihalyi, Jan 14, 2020.

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  1. Thomas Mihalyi

    Thomas Mihalyi New Member

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    I have a 1977 camaro type LT and I’m just asking if there as an airflow problem with these cars in the engine bay it seems like no outside air gets in and nothing comes out idk for sure I might be wrong
     
  2. BonzoHansen

    BonzoHansen Administrator Lifetime Gold Member

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    Are you having a problem of some sort?
     
  3. berg2695

    berg2695 Veteran Member

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    That's an interesting question. I think that there is plenty of inflow, maybe too much, but most of it exits under the car. That's not ideal aerodynamically, but probably not really a problem for a street car. I like the idea of hood vents like the newer performance cars have, but I don't want all that hot air flowing over the hood and then down into the ventilation system. There's no free lunch it seems.:(
     
  4. CorkyE

    CorkyE Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    That's an issue I've thought about from time to time, especially now that I've installed an EFI system and monitor IAT. It gets real warm under the hood during summer. I've heard the front fender side vents on Z-28's could be made functional, but have never seen it done.
     
  5. Gary S

    Gary S Administrator Lifetime Gold Member

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    The 80-81 fender vents are functional and you can feel heat coming out from them. However, I don't believe it is needed. The grille area is large enough to flow adequate air to remove the heat from the engine to the outside. If you have overheating problems, something is wrong in the cooling system, not in the design of the engine compartment.
    Remember that these cars have stood the test of time being able to cool themselves for half a century and work.
     
    BillyDean7173 likes this.

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