Fuel lines: Hard VS Braided Steel

Discussion in 'High Tech Retrofits' started by Aceshigh, May 16, 2011.

Fuel Injection up to 500hp which is better ??

  1. Steel lines

    31 vote(s)
    86.1%
  2. Braided steel rubber lines

    5 vote(s)
    13.9%
  1. Turbo70Camaro

    Turbo70Camaro Veteran Member Gold Member

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  2. BonzoHansen

    BonzoHansen Administrator Lifetime Gold Member

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    I don't think aluminum fuel lines are appropriate for the street. But that is just me.
     
  3. daniel76309

    daniel76309 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Ted--I think those are the same fittings I originally had been working with, but according to the note in the Speedway catalog, they are not to be used with fuel injection. I don't know what the problem is, but that is what it says. I am thinking that someone must have had a problem using them for fuel injection, and that is why the disclaimer. Because of that, I did something different, but obviously it seems to be working for you.
     
  4. mrvedit

    mrvedit Veteran Member

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    I think your opinion is a good one for reasons of caution and should be considered by anyone choosing between Aluminum and Steel lines. As I only drive paved roads, I "probably" will get away with Aluminum.
    Thanks.
     
  5. BondoSpecial

    BondoSpecial Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    daniel is actually correct, that the compression fitting to AN fittings are not rated for high pressure. I used one on my system but only on the return which is very low pressure, none on the high pressure side. The reason is the body of the fitting is aluminum and the ferrule is probably also aluminum, which when swaged onto a steel line is not a high pressure connection. The only way to make a high pressure ferrule style connection on steel would be with a steel bodied, steel ferrule compression fitting.
     
  6. mrvedit

    mrvedit Veteran Member

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    Perhaps it was the owner of ANplumbing.com or another experienced "plumber" who said those crimp-sleeve fittings are good for at most 100 psi and need to be assembled very carefully for even the 60 psi of EFI. I recall that for 4 ends, I had to recut the tubing twice and replace the crimp sleeves in order to eliminate leaks.
    Thanks for explaining how you did it - I bought the sleeves and nuts but didn't know I had to flare it.
     
  7. ULTM8Z

    ULTM8Z Veteran Member

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    I used braided teflon lines on mine. Been a few years now. Braided rubber will give off a fuel odor.

    IMO, steel lines are ideal. But practically speaking, the braided lines are much easier to install when you're lying on your back under the car trying to route the fuel system.
     
  8. BonzoHansen

    BonzoHansen Administrator Lifetime Gold Member

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    My #1 goal is reliability. I don't trust probably. my wifes pilot has aluminum coolant lines under it for the rear heater. It is 100% pavement since it is a glorified minivan. Sits twice as high as my camaro, maybe 3 times. They got torn in half by debris in the street I could not avoid. I'll pass on aluminum. There is a reason the OEs used steel tube with rock guard around it.
     
  9. Aceshigh

    Aceshigh Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I guess I'm not grasping an understanding of why it's better to have the fuel regulator
    up closer to the fuel rails , VS closer to the tank so you only have to run 1 long line.

    Just a thought here but.....that stuff you posted initially can be bent by hand.
    If it's that malleable, it's probably going to cave in faster then aluminum lines.

    I'm still trying to decide WTF I'm going to use here......can't decide if I want steel or aluminum. :confused: Saw a thread on Pro-touring where a member scoffed at the Summit coils of Aluminum fuel lines calling it low quality.

    I like what Gat-TaGo did with his GTO lines. All hard stuff and got his compression fittings at the local hydraulic supply store and saved a bundle. Just not sure I want to do 100% hard lines. I'd like to do like JJ and run hard up the chassis and the last few feet go flex lines on both ends.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2011
  10. camcojb

    camcojb Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    you'll always have people who say that the regulator up front at the rails is the best way to go, and I can see their point as far as pressure variances due to injectors opening, harmonics in the rails, etc. However, I have been running rear mounted regulators bypassing near the tank for many years without issue, and on very high hp setups.

    As far as those hardware store fittings there's nothing wrong with them, other than I'd avoid any non-mandrel bent angled fitting like that 90 degree fitting at the tank. I know that's the return line but if it's too restrictive it will cause the fuel pressure to change. Definitely no-no in my opinion on the fuel inlet to the pump, but I cannot see what Andrew did there in that pic. And he knows what he's doing so in his case that fitting on the return line is likely fine, this was just a reminder that those forged 90 degree fittings are much more restrictive than a mandrel hose end with a straight fitting.

    I would definitely run a flex line from the subframe to the engine to handle engine movement.
     

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