Fuel lines

Discussion in 'High Tech Retrofits' started by 408maro, Feb 9, 2016.

  1. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    So you end up using the connections already on the fuel line along with an adapter so you can use AN fittings for the braided line. That's easier than I was thinking.
     
  2. LT1 WS6

    LT1 WS6 Veteran Member

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    It's a compression fitting. You cut the tube to remove the original fitting or barb, then slide the compression to AN fitting on and tighten it down. I did this originally on my car. Then, I redid it all to run it more cleanly and with less flex and fittings.

    As for aluminum versus steel. Yes, steel is more durable but using aluminum is not a problem. Support aluminum well and you'll be fine. Besides, just how many miles per year do you really think you'll be driving the car?
     
  3. Scott51

    Scott51 Veteran Member

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    Yep most of the major fittings manufacturers make aluminium hard line especially for high corrosion resistance applications such as e85 and alcohol fuels. As said if it's properly supported so it can't vibrate and work harden you won't have any problems.

    I used a couple of those hard line adapters on my trans cooler lines and they're pretty nice but also spendy. If you're not afraid of removing your factory hard lines or are replacing them, ring around and see if you can find someone to put 37 deg (an) flares on the ends with -6 or -8 tube nuts instead. Most of the hydraulics shops around me will do that kind of thing for free if I'm buying parts off them or $10max if I've got everything prepped - way cheaper and a bit cleaner imho than the adapters.
     
  4. Scott51

    Scott51 Veteran Member

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  5. hot72rod

    hot72rod Veteran Member Gold Member

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    Like LT1 WS6 said you have to cut the barb off the stock line.

    I have an after market fuel rail and instead of have my fuel intake on the back of the rail like the factory I mover it to the front so that I would have to snake the fuel line across the fire wall. The metal line comes out in the stock f-body location (sorry but don't have a pick of it) I just used a 90 and plumb up.

    [​IMG]

    The tube to AN fitting number is EAR-AT165006ERL

    The AN straight swivel hose fitting is ERL-AT800106ERL

    The number for the hose is EAR-306006ERL

    The 90 deg hose fitting is EAR-AT809006ERL
     
  6. drptop70ss

    drptop70ss Veteran Member

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    Some of my cars I use steel line sections with nylon ends at the tank and at the engine (done this way by GM on my 93 up camaro donor cars, but I think the steel was only used because the fuel lines are exposed on those cars) and some cars I use 100% nylon lines like GM used on the 94-96 caprices. Dirt cheap and will never rust or crack from fatigue.
     
  7. hot72rod

    hot72rod Veteran Member Gold Member

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    Nylon will age with time and crack. So while it is cheep and durable at some point in time they will have to be replaced.
     
  8. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    it's starting to make sense now. It's been so long since I looked at fuel lines on my car that I forgot how they were setup. There are no threaded ends on GM fuel lines, just barbs to attach the rubber pieces to jump to the next hard line until you get to the engine bay.
     
  9. hot72rod

    hot72rod Veteran Member Gold Member

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    Correct.
     
  10. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Also, the fuel line for my 76 from inlinetube.com was like $69, so pretty reasonable when you factor in the cost of time to bend tube from scratch. The added cost comes from the flex line and fittings you use in place of where rubber line would have gone versus just running a hard line the entire way.

    When you ran your line did you have flex line from the tank to the first hard line section and then flex line in between the two hard line sections?

    Also, you made your own line from the filter/regulator back to the tank? Or was that flex line too?
     

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