Gosh Darn you LS1!! The Front Seal

Discussion in 'High Tech Retrofits' started by sbca96, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. Leonards78LT

    Leonards78LT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    The engine I was referring to is in my '06 Silverado. :confused:
     
  2. sbca96

    sbca96 Veteran Member

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    Isnt your 78 running an iron block LS also?

    Tom
     
  3. SupplySgt

    SupplySgt Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Finally back home!!!
    I will say, my grandparents have almost 300k on their 05 Z71. Keep in mind it's a farm truck, and they have land in NE OK and south TX so most of the miles are highway. Only major issue was the the rear end and that was the fault of the dealer doing service on it. They bought it new and are meticulous on their maintenance. Still drives like new and I got 18 mpg running almost 80 on the turnpike.

    That being said, I have a soft spot for the L31 Vortec 350 like what's in my 78. If I hadn't been an idiot and sold my 96 Sierra when I was on Active Duty I'd probably still be driving it. My 93 Burb is pushing 300k but that TBI struggles at times.
     
  4. sbca96

    sbca96 Veteran Member

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    Another vote for iron blocks. Perhaps these issues ARE linked to the aluminum...

    Tom
     
  5. SupplySgt

    SupplySgt Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I had never thought of it that way. But all my experience with LS based motors are my grandparents 05 5.3, aunt's 02 5.3, and a friend's 01 8.1. As you said, all iron blocks. I've never messed with aluminum.
     
  6. sbca96

    sbca96 Veteran Member

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    OK .. so I got the old seal out and now I need to put the new one in, I read that
    it just pushes into place and I also see there is a flange in there so the depth of
    the part is controlled (thanks Haynes for the undo fear).

    I read three different ways to install this, I always put LT1 seals in dry, then put
    a little oil on the inside of the seal. The LS1 they list, dry, oiled and permatexed.

    I dont like the idea of using oil, Permatex will make it difficult the next time. The
    dry method lists brake clean to insure the surface is clean.

    thoughts?

    Tom
     
  7. sbca96

    sbca96 Veteran Member

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    I put the seal in dry outside, and light oil inside and put oil on the mating surface
    of the balancer. The holder tool and the installer tool worked perfect. The right
    tool for the job sure makes a difference.

    I made a template to check depth of the balancer, but it seems it finds its home.
    I just have the GM bolt to do now, as far as I can tell?

    This part is done from the installer tool :

    As far as I can tell I just have this left to do :

    So I simply torque the bolt to 37 ft lbs and then mark the head, and 140 degrees
    from the mark and turn until the two marks line up?

    Tom
     
  8. mrvedit

    mrvedit Veteran Member

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    Yes, you have it right.
    IIRC, it is also recommended to put loctite (red?) on the threads of the crank bolt.
    I personally have never been able to turn it 140 degrees; somewhere around 250 ft/lbs it has only turned 100 degrees. I usually get it about 120 degrees.
     
  9. Leonards78LT

    Leonards78LT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    The way I look at it, (and others may chime in if I am wrong), even though the technique for serrating the liner and using a shrink to fit method and letting it to expand to lock into the aluminum block, it is still not a perfect mating surface IMO, you still have a steel liner and aluminum block which expands and contracts at different rates. Plus the ever changing combustion chamber pressures and temperatures eventually takes its toll.

    The liner is very thin, if a recall.
     
  10. sbca96

    sbca96 Veteran Member

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    Leonard .. yes agreed. There is a downside to mixing metals, the LS1 engine isnt
    that much lighter then its old end of the run SBC. The use of aluminum heads on
    an iron block has proven itself over time, but the sleeved block might be too much
    to ask in the long haul.

    Perhaps had they made the sleeves as plugs that overlapped the head gasket it
    could have helped to maintain the combustion inside the individual cylinders. The
    effort was good on the LS design, but there was a lot of areas they could have
    improved on. This is the drawback of fancy software and flashy young engineers
    that lack the "gift". They enter the profession for the money, not enjoyment and
    fulfillment. I enjoy design, I can see it in my head, improve something without the
    use of a computer. I did this for almost 13 years at my last job, working in all the
    areas of design, development, testing, failure brainstorming and improvement ......

    Tom
     

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