mini starter questions

Discussion in 'High Performance Modifications' started by speedfreak1000, Feb 4, 2012.

  1. speedfreak1000

    speedfreak1000 Veteran Member

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    pm'ed you massD
     
  2. MassD

    MassD Veteran Member

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    Reply sent Speed! And Pictures sent
     
  3. gregs78cam

    gregs78cam Member

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  4. vegas1974z28

    vegas1974z28 Moderator Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

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  5. speedfreak1000

    speedfreak1000 Veteran Member

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    does anyone run a heat shield around their starter? if so did you notice a difference?

    to answer one question above my battery is about a year old and i have either a 120 or 100 amp alt. cant remember which.

    over the years its just getting alittle harder to start after it warms up. im scared its gonna leave me stuck. i already leave it running at gas stations or when im not gonna be in somewhere for awhile.
     
  6. 5spd540

    5spd540 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    You should not need one on a mini starter
     
  7. gregs78cam

    gregs78cam Member

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    If you find a factory one like I posted, there is a good chance it will have a heat shield on it from the factory. But you really shouldn't need one unless you have really high exhaust temps.
     
  8. Rich Schmidt

    Rich Schmidt Veteran Member

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    I run the GM stock type mini starter on a lot of engines. I even had one on the big block in my race car for a while and it worked great even with the distributor locked out at 38 degrees. I currently have one on the 408 small block in my daily driver,the 13:1 355 in my friend's race car with the distributor locked t 32 degrees,and the same guy has one on the 6-71 blown 355 that he has in his pro street car. You need to use the supplied special bolts with these starters(or get the bolts if you buy the actually GM starter). The only reason why I dont still have on on my race car is because I didnt use the correct bolts,and wrecked one of the holes in my block. I had to use a $300+ Tilton starter or otherwise yank the engine and fix the hole. The new starter was an easier fix during a busy race season. I would trust the GM type starter before I trusted a "cheapie" dressed up hot rod starter. If you are going to go with a hot rod starter then go with a high quality one,and not just any shiny one that looks cool.

    Two more things. IMHO the battery cables that cone with a relocating kit(if you have one)arent big enough for any engine,even a mild stock smogger. I run single O welding cable in all my stuff,with good ends on them. Another thing,the big "1000 cranking amp" truck batteries that parts stores often give guys a "good deal" on are junk. They are made from low grade lead and degrade after a year or two. A good name brand 72 month battery(I prefer Delco) is much better,even if you only go for a 650 cranking amp one. A good sprial cell battery is also a great choice,but much more exepensive.
     
  9. Todd80Z28

    Todd80Z28 Moderator Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    For me, it wasn't about the kit cables or the battery. Instead, I had forgotten to upgrade the engine-to-chassis ground.

    Gear reduction starters pull less current than a typical older GM starter, so they shouldn't need monstrous cables and batteries to roll the engine. What they DO need however, is a good, clean path for current flow.
    I put my battery in the trunk back in the mid 90s with the typical low-buck Summit relo kit. I ran the batt cable, attached the ground to the chassis. And then forgot to do anything else...
    It worked alright for a long time with the two small factory grounds off the engine. It always rolled sort of slow, though. Initially, I just thought it was the GMPP gear reduction starter (with the Bowtie logo on it). After a while though, it got slower, and slower, and finally, the ground from the cyl head to the firewall smoked one day. This is when I had the "Duh!" moment, upgraded it to a flat 4ga piece, and made sure I had a good clean bare metal attaching point on both sides.
    It rolls like a champ now. Granted, mine is only a mild 350 with initial timing at 12*, but I'm using the 2ga summit wire, and a Honda civic sized 51R battery (Optima Yellow Top), rated at 500CCA. It rolls fine even on the coldest days, provided I haven't let it go dead:rolleyes: (radio drain).

    Engine grounds- VERY important in a relocated setup.
     

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