Shoud I buy this L94 engine?????

Discussion in 'High Tech Retrofits' started by 70 gsconvt, Nov 23, 2012.

  1. camarochevy1970

    camarochevy1970 Veteran Member

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    I never said they were bad i said the truck heads were better. They have a thicker deck surface and can take more pressure. And with the slightly larger combustion chambers lower compression a touch allowing for more boost.
     
  2. camarochevy1970

    camarochevy1970 Veteran Member

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    However if rectangle port heads are your thing then i certainly advise running on a larger displacement engine. The large intake valve get shrouded by a 4 inch bore cylinder so you either bore or go to a 6.2
     
  3. 70 gsconvt

    70 gsconvt Veteran Member

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    I'm not concerned about the suspension as that's all going to get replaced also with all the good stuff (control arms, real coil-over shocks, etc). Just figured that if I'm going to go for the "wow" factor of an LS-swap, I'd go all the way and have the all aluminum engine.

    As far as compression goes, if I built a stroker, I'd put it near 11 to 1. I didn't look up what the L94's is, but I'd bet it's similar. That's why I'd stick with a supercharger that is made to go on an otherwise stock engine. Just stick a bit better cam in.

    My biggest thing is that the engine is already together and only has 20-some thousand miles on it. All I would need to do is pull the timing cover and intake and I could actually keep the entire alphabet the engine has. TSP has cams made to work with the DOD/AFM. Not that I'm concerned with fuel economy at all with this car. It's just going to be a fun car. Just hopefully a fun car that'll do mid-11's in the quarter and get to 150 mph in a hurry.
     
  4. Air_Adam

    Air_Adam Veteran Member

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  5. camarochevy1970

    camarochevy1970 Veteran Member

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    I think he wants 500 to the wheels. A cam and ls3 intake alone wont do that
     
  6. Air_Adam

    Air_Adam Veteran Member

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    500rwhp, ya that won't likely happen with just a cam, as thats around 650 crank hp.

    Having already 10.4:1 CR and a set of rectangle port heads that will support over 600hp unmodified, it really wouldn't take much to get there. The bottom end can take it, its quite strong in the 6.2L. There are LOTS of LS3 Camaro guys out there making near, at, or over 600 crank hp with a stock bottom end LS3. Use a more aggressive cam, aftermarket intake and exhaust, and a good dyno tune and you should get pretty close to your goal on reasonable money. There is nothing wrong with using an aluminum block for a boosted application if you go that route either. A friend of mine built a new engine for his '98 Z28 which is a 9:1 CR LS2-based 402ci turbo motor. On his last dyno run he was putting I think 12psi through it and it handled it just fine. He's planning for 15psi or maybe more, but he's just taking it up a bit at a time while working out a few unrelated bugs with the car. I don't remember the exact figure but it made something along the lines of 550rwhp and nearly 600rwtq at 12psi, and that was with shutting it down early due to fuel system problems causing it to lean out above 4500rpm. Point it, the aluminum blocks can handle a TON of power, so there's no reason to ditch the aluminum block for an iron one.

    Go visit www.LS1tech.com and go looking around in the Gev IV engine forums... you'll find lots of good build info there.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2012
  7. camarochevy1970

    camarochevy1970 Veteran Member

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    Lol yeah i have built a few Ls motors and boosted ones as well and yes aluminum blocks are good to about 1000 hp. After that it gets iffy. I personally wouldnt pay a premium for aluminum though if you can get a good deal on iron block. Last boosted ls we finished was in a gto, made 610 rwhp on 11 psi and runs 10.18 in the quarter.

    If boosting an LS I highly recommend you take the time to change the rod bolts, use ls9 heads gaskets and head studs. Its just cheap insurance.

    As far as an aggresive cam on an ls3 headee vehicle make sure you talk to someone to help spec it out. The larger intake valve greatly reduces how large of a cam you can run.
     
  8. newschool72

    newschool72 Veteran Member

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    If you want to pull the lifters, im pretty sure the heads will have to come off.
     
  9. newschool72

    newschool72 Veteran Member

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    The biggest problem with boosting an LS, iron or aluminum, is 4 bolts per cylinder on the heads. after about 15psi head gaskets have a bad habit of going bad when the heads lift.
     
  10. 70 gsconvt

    70 gsconvt Veteran Member

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    Yes, definitely 500 rear wheel horsepower.

    But I know it's torque that rules on the street. And I just love the torque curve generated by these engines with VVT.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2012

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