Tough spot/decision with my build - needing advise.

Discussion in '1974 Specific' started by gmoldmule, Aug 12, 2019.

  1. gmoldmule

    gmoldmule New Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2016
    Location:
    Colorado
    Hey all.
    Here is the story. I picked up my 74 LT from a farm field outside of the town I grew up in. My buddy had bought it from a salvage in town back in 94 and they didn't give him the title. I actually knew this car from my drag racing/cruising days in High School. I did the due diligence and have what Colorado calls a builders title. Meaning, state patrol inspection, the state cleared it and reprinted the title with my name on it now. But, they hold it until I get the car together enough to pass a safety inspection. Meaning, I have the legit title sitting in a file at the DMV office...

    The interior, front bumper and grill parts were stolen by a guy that stored his 74 on the farm after the car was pushed out of the garage it was in by the renter who wasn't supposed to have access to the garage.

    Sometime over the years, the rear part was submerged in water enough that I dumped about 2 gallons of water out of the transmission when I pulled it. I also found it got rear-ended on the left side and the bumper won't set properly. So, it's pretty mush a waste of time to try and fix what is there. It will need to do full inner/outer quarter panels, wheel houses, tail light panel and possibly trunk filler panels. Oddly enough, the trunk floor pan looks brand new. I only have a couple small holes in the inside floor pan.

    Where I am now. I have mostly new interior (carpet, headliner, door panels rear deck) and some used trim pieces. I have nice front seats out of a 2012 Chevy car.
    The dash is 100% perfect condition (other than beer bottle caps stuck to the knobs) - meaning all original and complete - with the factory stereo. I have the back seats and interior floor patch panels, side and rear glass are perfect. I have legit side pipes that need the crossover tubes replaced. The doors are good, but front fenders need to be replaced. I scoured the country and ended up finding both bumpers - about a year apart. One of which I had to fly into Austin TX (had to get a welder from my bro-n-law too), drove to NW Dallas area and picked up the rear bumper and the console from a salvage.

    Here is my dilemma - I have 3 options... We obviously can't get repop bumpers for these cars, so if I spend all the time and money replacing all of the sheet metal and I ever need a bumper again, I could be toast.
    1) do I just sell the car with all of the parts I have - I can legally sell it with the builders title paperwork.
    2) do I rebuild it using the proper parts.
    3) do I rebuild it using 70-73 parts and go pay $275 for new pencil bumpers and always be able to get those parts.

    What do you guys think?

    Thanks,
    Greg "Mac".
     

    Attached Files:

  2. QUAKE_WARS

    QUAKE_WARS Veteran Member

    Messages:
    2,017
    Likes Received:
    149
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Location:
    No portion may be used with or without permission
    70/73 will be your best bet!! DON'T SELL, A 74 is rare anyway.
     
    gmoldmule likes this.
  3. zfool

    zfool Veteran Member

    Messages:
    588
    Likes Received:
    16
    Joined:
    May 19, 2014
    Location:
    Rochester, MN
    I’ve been watching for good bumpers in my area for about 5-6 years. They are out there. Actually there’s been a time or two I could have got the whole care for about what most want for good bumpers. It’s just never worked out for me. I just miss them or they are 500 miles away.
    My first Camaro was a 74 LT. They are very nice cars but possibly not worth restoring at this time. That said it wasn’t long ago that 71 Z28’s weren’t worth it either. I remember laughing at a guy with a bondo bucket triple option 73 when he wanted $1500.00 and he called me a effin egghead lol. So if you’re planning on keeping it for awhile. Do it right. If you’re just looking to keep it alive as a 71-73 and dump it cheap. Do that.
    I think eventually the 74’s and even the early 75’s with the F41 will see appreciation in value.
     
  4. gmoldmule

    gmoldmule New Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2016
    Location:
    Colorado
    I am really wanting to keep the car and do the 70-73 conversion. My X-fiance had a 70-1/2 RS/SS (split bumper, rubber nose, 396, Muncie 4 spd, 12 bolt posi) that I loved the looks on. I had a 78 Z-28 that I got in High School and had to sell when I got out of college to get a real "work" vehicle.

    I chose the pre 75 because I don't have to do emissions on them here in CO. I love the pencil bumper cars and really have no problem modding this one to be one. I have a couple grand tied up in performance parts for this one should I build it. Along with the roughly $800 in bumpers for it.
    I have a factory 300hp crate 350 and an old 2-4 tunnel ram with velocity stacks for it, but, also have a Gen VI Vortec 454 stashed away to build a stroker with later.

    The other factor is a couple of other cars to build that will be cheaper and easier than the body work on this one...
    Like a 1940 Plymouth Deluxe Coupe and a 29 Model A Tudor w/ 49 Merc Flathead - traditional rod build.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2019
  5. 72BIGBLOCK

    72BIGBLOCK Veteran Member

    Messages:
    2,376
    Likes Received:
    83
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2008
    Location:
    SF
    Clone a 70 to 73 rally sport and get it over with
     
  6. perkalator

    perkalator Veteran Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Likes Received:
    89
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2014
    Location:
    kennewick wa
    My vote is keep original. Parts are hard to find for big bumper cars. Pm me and ill send you a guys number in Washington state that parts second gens. He will keep a eye out if he doesn't have them.
     
    zfool likes this.
  7. mallard

    mallard Veteran Member

    Messages:
    535
    Likes Received:
    118
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2013
    Location:
    SK, Canada
    This is a tough one as you're likely to get as many opinions as there are posters. I'm somewhat biased as I have a nice '74 Type LT Z28 that I've had for 35 years. I'm inclined to suggest you fix it however, if on a straight $ value, (and I see yours is a factory AC car which helps) unless it's a z28 it's unlikely you'll ever recoup anything close to the cost of rebuilding it. If you love the car that much then you'll have to let your gut be your guide on this.

    PS I didn't know bumpers were that hard to find. I believe they're the same 74-77 are they not? I've had a spare pair that have sat in my garage since I dismantled what remained of my parts car and disposed of it some 24 or 25 years ago.
     
  8. SPG

    SPG Bumblebee Builder

    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    58
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2018
    Location:
    Sacramento
    In 77 they added extra rubber bumps so the nose isn't the only thing taking an impact head on, but that doesn't change anything about the bumper, you can use them on all 74-77 model years.
    From my understanding the bumpers are one of the few things not reproduced on a 2nd gen.
     
  9. CamaroNmotion

    CamaroNmotion Veteran Member

    Messages:
    344
    Likes Received:
    17
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2006
    Location:
    Buffalo, NY
    The 74-77 bumpers are all the same. Bumper guards (front and rear) was an option RPO V30 for '74-'77. The only difference is the protective rubber strips. 1974 originally had end caps front and rear,the 1st design, later that year the 2nd design arrived which was the one piece and remained through '77.
     
    SPG likes this.
  10. SPG

    SPG Bumblebee Builder

    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    58
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2018
    Location:
    Sacramento
    Good to know, I've only seen those bump stops on 77 models
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.