Welding door gaps

Discussion in 'Body Restoration' started by woody80z28, Oct 4, 2015.

  1. earlysecond

    earlysecond Veteran Member

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    I sold in the aftermarket right out of college. THAT lookss like a really old Rubber Seal can! Prolly stillngood though!
     
  2. bodymanbill

    bodymanbill Veteran Member

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    Actually Its only a couple months old. I go through a can of it probably every two months at the shop
     
  3. earlysecond

    earlysecond Veteran Member

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    Bill,
    Wow! They must have never changed labels then haha!
     
  4. woody80z28

    woody80z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Now you have me wondering if cavity wax would be better for the bottom edge of the door as well. Everything was blasted, epoxied and then assembled so I'm not really worried about the prep for that part.

    Am I correct in thinking that seam sealer is more permanent than cavity wax as long as the prep is good?

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Double R Restorations

    Double R Restorations Veteran Member Gold Member

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    An idea that was given to me was taping the folded edge and filling the inside with some epoxy.
     
  6. earlysecond

    earlysecond Veteran Member

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    What did the factory do? I like over -engineering stuff. Maybe im not clear on what you are asking?
     
  7. Scott51

    Scott51 Veteran Member

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    the problem with these kind of solutions is the inability to properly prep inaccessible areas so once adhesion fails or you get cracking from movement the product just becomes a moisture trap.

    Also even a heavily reduced paint won't have viscosity comparable to most cavity waxes or fish oil products - the idea is to seep and creep, in a good way.
     
  8. Scott51

    Scott51 Veteran Member

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    looks like you did a great job priming everything before assembly so are already way ahead of the what the factory did and just need to keep moisture out and prevent rust starting on any areas that you've burnt off paint from welding.

    Don't know if I'd say seam sealer is more permanent they're really two different products for two different applications. Seam sealer for keeping moisture out (buy yeah proper prep is necessary) and cavity wax or fish oil for preventing rust.

    Even if you could prep the inside of the lap joints to apply seam sealer it's not going to creep into the flange so I'd be worried about creating a potential air/moisture trap for the inaccessible areas effected by welding to start rusting.
     
  9. woody80z28

    woody80z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I think the best game plan would be to cavity wax the seams that have been welded and hit them with a rag soaked it brake clean or something to clean off the accessible areas for the seam sealer to adhere.

    In theory that way the cavity wax stays in the bare metal (burned epoxy) area and you can seal off any moisture from getting in.

    Anyone tried something similar?
     
  10. jimbaughan

    jimbaughan Veteran Member

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    I put my skins on with door skin adhesive. After hammering the edges flat I just wiped off what oozed out. No chance for water to ever get between the panels.
     

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