What is "hardener" in paint for?

Discussion in 'Body Restoration' started by Cardinal, Nov 13, 2011.

  1. Cardinal

    Cardinal Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I'm not sure exactly what he was thinking either. JD and this "friend" spent HOURs block sanding it, 40 man hours just to get the Unlimited Products fiberglass hood to fit, put new front fenders on it, etc. just to urinate it away by not putting the hardener in the paint gun????

    I was LIVID when I found out! And the "friend" is a good body man (I've seen his work and he is very good) BUT I was flabergasted when JD told me that the "friend" didn't put the hardener in. JD was going to be there when he painted it but he had to work late that night so he wasn't there.

    JD and I CANNOT paint vehicles. We have NO patience and don't have the "eye" or feel for body work or paint application. I bow down to all of you who are body workers and painters.
     
  2. BondoSpecial

    BondoSpecial Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    If he was using cheap old school acrylic enamel, technically hardener is optional, unlike cross-linking modern urethane paints. However if he used acrylic enamel that would point it out as being a bottom of the barrel grade respray job and then I'd still be very angry...
     
  3. dcozzi

    dcozzi Veteran Member

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    That's the thing that confused me about him "using it later".
    Maybe he did not know how to use a disposable plastic measuring cup or what the ratios were.

    Friend:rolleyes:
     
  4. flowjoe

    flowjoe Moderator Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I was going to say that...something like Dupont's Centarri would not "need" hardener...while it is old school now, back in the day it was used for high end paint jobs (just as lacquer was). Before striping it all off I'd find out for sure what paint was used. If it was an acrylic enamel then maybe this paint job could be "saved" in the short term to save up to repaint down the road.

    If I'm reading this post correctly then the paints been on for 5 years...why the heartburn now? I would have thought that this issue would have been dealt with long ago.
     
  5. toadyoty

    toadyoty Veteran Member

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  6. Cardinal

    Cardinal Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    As for the "heartburn" after five years, it takes that long for me to come to a boil about some things! LOL!

    Actualy, JD and I were talking about his '83 S10 and what he wanted to do to it once he graduates from college. The first thing he wanted to do was to re-do the paint as it ticked him off that it chips so easily. It has been THEE one sore spot about his Blue Beast that has bugged both of us to no end. Every time the paint chips (for whatever reason) it opens up an old wound that just won't get better.

    That and I never got a difinitive answer to why it chips so easily.

    Here is a picture of JD standing by his Blue Beast III shortly after we got it home from being painted:

    [​IMG]
     
  7. earlysecond

    earlysecond Veteran Member

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    Ok so even if the hardener was optional. . .it was PAID for. I hope that he was not using enamel paint.

    Again, sorry this happened. As to why it chips easily. . .could be about anything. You would think that soft paint could not chip. Unless I am way off base, one reason that this could happen (there are many so this is speculation) is non-compatible substrates. In other words, if short cuts were taken and old school supplies were used, what is under that crappy top coat? Lacquer Primer? Who knows.

    In order to put a great paint job on that truck the old junk needs to come off. I just cannot see it any other way. Especially since there may be adhesion issues.

    Again, sorry but it has already been said.
     
  8. Cardinal

    Cardinal Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Not half as sorry as I am! LOL!

    I too wonder about the "substrate" (primer). I am pretty sure that they stripped the truck down to bare metal as JD talked about the time they spent doing that. BUT I do NOT know what primer our paint (for that matter) that they used.
     
  9. wookie

    wookie Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Too bad you didn't live closer...
     
  10. LtRsZ

    LtRsZ Veteran Member

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    Is that a real pic? He looks a little small next to the truck. Maybe it's the angle?
     

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