2018 Audi S5 Quattro coupe...

Discussion in 'The BS Topic' started by Buickfunnycar, Jun 3, 2017.

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  1. 351maverick

    351maverick full time Ebay seller/hustler/car killer

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    I'm foolish as f*ck, we all know this

    I fly an American flag outside my house every day....and I'll have words & worse with anyone who might have a problem with that
     
    71 rs BBC likes this.
  2. XxWickedz28xX

    XxWickedz28xX Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Signed in just to like the preceding 2 posts....

    That is all....
     
  3. The Champ

    The Champ Veteran Member

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    Lowend

    The American Automotive Labeling Act (AALA) sticker you posted is a very flawed system (it's a government label - do you expect it to be accurate?).

    I suggest you also look at the more definitive study - 2016 KOGOD MADE IN AMERICA AUTO INDEX.

    http://kogodbusiness.com/reports/auto-index/

    The Kogod School of Business looks at more relevant information than the AALA...

    The seven criteria are as follows:

    1. Profit Margin. This was measured based on the location of an automaker’s headquarters. If an automaker’s global headquarters is located in the US, the model receives a 6. If it is not, it receives a 0. The assumption here is that (on average), 6% of a vehicle’s value is profit margin, so if it is a U.S. automaker, the profits remain in the country.
    2. Labor. This category considers where the car is assembled. If a model is assembled in the US, it receives a 6. If not, the model receives a 0. We assume that approximately 6% of the vehicle’s value is labor content.
    3. Research and Development (R&D). This category looks at the location of a car’s R&D activities. If the model is a product of a US company, it receives a 6. If it is the product of a foreign company but is assembled in the U.S. it receives a 3; if it is a foreign import it receives a 1.
    4. Inventory, Capital and other expenses. If assembly occurs in the US, the model receives an 11; if not, it receives a 0.
    5. Engine. If the engine is produced in the US, the model receives a 14; if not it receives a 0.
    6. Transmission. If the transmission is produced in the US, the model receives a 7; if not it receives a 0.
    7. Body, Chassis, and Electrical Components. 50 % of a vehicle’s score is assigned to this category. The AALA percentage is divided into two to derive this score.
    I personally do feel that where the profit dollars go matter. I want to see more Americans employed at decent wages - whether it be in the factory building the cars or the R&D facilities.

    Hey, I'm just waving my American flag...;) [​IMG]
     
    PalmbchZ28 likes this.
  4. indy camaro

    indy camaro Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Wow what a thread. It reminds me of a "politics & religion" argument.
    What's weird is I agree with both sides of the story.
    John, enjoy that great car, it looks nice :smokin:. Good for you guys.
    Dirt and others, I will pick you up in my 4X4 and we will go get a lobster bisque salad.;)
     
    Dave Nelson likes this.
  5. Lowend

    Lowend Administrator. .a car, a man, a maraca. Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I'm aware of Kogod, and it's an interesting equation and a good model. My only problem with them is: why is profitability attached to the equation? It has nothing to do with where something is produced.

    My point about all of this has long been: To say something is "American Made" at this point is vague at best.
    All it really means is: The majority of the C-Level executive offices are in the USA.
    Does it really matter where the 5-10 guys in leather chairs keep their offices? Especially when you consider that all automotive companies are public and their shares are internationally traded. The bulk of ownership is "out-there" with the stock.

    • Subaru (Fuji) has a massive assembly plant in Indiana
    • Honda has plants in Ohio, Indiana and Alabama
    • VW (which Audi is part of) has a plant in TN
    (there are many more examples)

    Why are these company's less "American made" than Ford, Chevy and Chrysler (<- sorry, that would be Fiat, Chrysler America).

    I'll add another example: Samsung (Korean) has more employees in the USA than Apple, Google, and Microsoft combined Do they qualify as "American Built"?
     
  6. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    That's fine, you can spend money however you see fit. But I won't buy American just for the sake of it. There has to be something more to it than just a patriotic angle. Besides that, the US is FAR better off with the advent of global markets, that is not debatable. It is naive to think that American vehicles don't incorporate "global" materials into them. A Honda is probably as American as a Ford is nowadays.
     
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  7. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    There's a huge difference between being "American proud" and virtue signaling by scolding others because they are merely looking at non-US made products.
     
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  8. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    So refusing to buy an inferior product is NOT an excuse to buy a non-US made product? :confused: If you want things to be "fixed" then demand better products from US companies. I am not in the mood to subsidize mediocrity.
     
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  9. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    What does that have to do with buying an Audi?
     
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  10. Buickfunnycar

    Buickfunnycar Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Well this whole thread has gone to poo real quick but I will agree with your statement 100%...those are my exact sediments.
     
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