2K primer surfacer

Discussion in 'Body Restoration' started by TX79Z28, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. TX79Z28

    TX79Z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I plan on shooting another coat of epoxy on my body shell, blocking it with some slick sand, a second coat of epoxy, and then shoot 3 coats of SPI primer surfacer for some final blocking.

    My question: How long can I leave the body shell in primer surfacer? It's in the garage, and will never be exposed to the elements. I want to do the body shell and then move on to the other panels but my "sequence" of work would require leaving the primer surfacer for a couple of months....could that be an issue?
     
  2. 71 Camaro

    71 Camaro Veteran Member

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    It is my impression that once sealed with the epoxy you can do whatever you want. Don't see any problem with your plan.
     
  3. TX79Z28

    TX79Z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Well, the slick sand would be sealed with the epoxy, but the 2K primer surfacer would be on top of the epoxy, and I was concerned that it would absorb moisture or other contaminants, although a good part of it will be sanded during the final block sanding
     
  4. 76 camaro car 1

    76 camaro car 1 Veteran Member

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    Once you have the bare metal covered I would not use anymore epoxy. Its more or less used as a primer to bite into the metal for adhesion purposes not to be used as a filler primer. The 2k primer on top of the epoxy will also work as a sealer as well as a filler primer. I've seen cars drive around for many years with just 2k primer on them with no sign of rust. Lacquer primer is the one you want to stay away from. Its holds water like a sponge.
     
  5. Ghostof76

    Ghostof76 Veteran Member

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    Let me get this right. Epoxy primer is non hygroscopic; such as rustolium primer is ,right? Once painted it won't rust like regular primer if not top coated in time.
     
  6. kawboy

    kawboy Veteran Member

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    Epoxy primer will seal. People use it under theirs cars without topcoating it. 2K primer will seal also. I myself like to let the 2K sit for as long as possible to cure out and shrink before moving to the next step. So what you are asking about it sitting for a couple of months is no problem at all. I would recommend that you don't let every Tom, Dick amd Harry that comes over rub their dirty greasy hands all over it though. It is funny how people have to touch things especially a new paint job to feel how smooth it is. Also no use of waxes or tire dressings around it at all. It is not worth taking any chances.
     
  7. 76 camaro car 1

    76 camaro car 1 Veteran Member

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    Yes,epoxy primer will seal out moisture but so will a 2k high build urethane primer. Epoxy primers are not intended to be used to build up a surface. Epoxy's can actually break down if left as a top coat from UV exposure. I would be a little skeptical about putting epoxy over anything but bare metal. A 2k urethane primer is a better choice on top of the epoxy and in my opinion would be a better top coat primer sealer because of the UV breakdown of epoxy.
     
  8. kawboy

    kawboy Veteran Member

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    Epoxies can be "thickened up" and used a little more like a build primer by mixing in a can and sealed up and then let it sit about a day before spraying. Also the SPI black epoxy has a UV inhibitor mixed in with it and can even be used as a hot rod black. Epoxy works well over bare steel, aluminum, fiberglass , etc. With the SPI epoxy you can thin 10%-50% and use as a sealer befor you paint (I do it all the time). One last not about epxy. I have had things that want to "kick" no matter what I do until I seal it with epoxy. Then no more problems. The thing is that everyone has their own ways and what works for them. So unless you do something with products that don't jive with each other and it bits you in the butt down the road just do what works for you. Thats all, I'm off to bed.
     
  9. TX79Z28

    TX79Z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    One of the members here suggested (and it sounds like a good idea to me) to shoot one thin coat of epoxy after all the Slick Sand blocking. I imagine that covers any small bare metal spots left after blocking, as well as having one uniform surface. Probably not a 100% necessary step, but sounds like good insurance.

    My main concern was the "durability" of primer surfacer, and my main concern was how much moisture it would "collect". I agree that no one would run their hands or fingers over it, because I think IT IS human instinct to do so! Fortunately, I live alone, and I don't let people into my work area (mostly because of the "touchy" factor!...and because I like my ALONE time! LOL!)

    I had read that a primer surfacer could absorb stains and other stuff, but it makes sense that it should be ok....just needed some back up on that!
     

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