Apple will not help FBI unlock terriorist phone

The Champ

Veteran Member
Sep 14, 2000
5,667
MN
71flh said:
Should your phone be unlocked and the contents read at the whim of some random request?
We could word this as apple will let anyone to read your info and the internet would babble differently.

I think you are missing the point here.

Apple is in receipt of a court order to provide information. The court ordered it because there is probable cause. There are 14 people that died in Farook's attack.

Think about how you would feel if you were a relative on one of the people that were killed by this couple.

This isn't about letting just anyone gain access to your phone based on a random request.
 

Z28zz383

Veteran Member
May 11, 2012
839
Florida
We have to take away any tools the terrorists use. Cell phones are one of their most used tools. Un-lock the phone, but don't tell anyone, for now. A lack of confidence in the presumed secrecy during their conversations would make them think twice before using the phone. It would make it more difficult for them. Problem with phones is, we have made our very lives dependant on them. C'mon it's just a phone, don't put your whole life on it and then worry about it. Just don't do it. The phones will be opened before long because the govt wants it to be available to them. Start cleaning out stuff you don't want anyone else to see.....Keep it somewhere else!
 

Camarolina

Veteran Member
Lifetime Gold Member
Jun 12, 2009
1,177
Unionville, NC
The Champ said:
I think you are missing the point here.

Apple is in receipt of a court order to provide information. The court ordered it because there is probable cause. There are 14 people that died in Farook's attack.

Think about how you would feel if you were a relative on one of the people that were killed by this couple.

This isn't about letting just anyone gain access to your phone based on a random request.

Well said Champ.
You gonna watch the Daytona 500 tomorrow?
Try not to blow a gasket. ;)
 
So many wrong assumptions here.

I messages are different then SMS period. They are encripted and NO the NSA nor the FBI have been able to crack it.

In the past when Apple has helped the unlock code was already in the Feds possession. It was a matter of Apple helping to decipher information.

This is a new situation. Apples has never been willing to break their own security.

Also the phone in question is not the newest of technology. It's a few years old now. Which in modern terms means dinosaur. Yet the Feds still can't do it.

They can't do it because Apple has never shared their proprietary information with anyone. Ever wonder why iPhones don't get viruses and androids do?

If Apple provides a back door, your iPhone, iPads and possible your iMacs will soon be susceptible to a number of intrusions.

I'm not saying what happened in San Bernadine was a small issue. But the loss of Liberty overall is a greater threat to our way of life than these rag tag terrorist. Our loss of Liberty is what has allowed us to be volnerable in the first place. American citizens giving up their identity for political correctness. The same avenue for which we have allowed many of our freedoms to be taken away.

Apple I believe is making a business decision. I don't believe they are politically motivated by any idea of rights to privacy. If they were to provide a back door, it could compromise many things which bring loyalty to their brand.

Regarless and for different reasons, I support them. If you choose not to, that's okay too. Just remember, the Feds can't see my iMessages. Can they see yours?

Ps I typed this on my iPhone. Big fingers little screen. If you are overly concerned with my punctuation and or spelling skills, I suggest getting out of your moms basement and meeting people.
 
Last edited:

FlaJunkie

Veteran Member
Lifetime Gold Member
Mar 24, 2001
6,456
Rockledge, Florida
parts_master1 said:
Just remember, the Feds can't see my iMessages.
homer-simpson-delusional.png
 

Camaro75LT

Masshole
Staff member
Lifetime Gold Member
May 17, 2001
6,651
Boston-ish
parts_master1 said:
If Apple provides a back door, your iPhone, iPads and possible your iMacs will soon be susceptible to a number of intrusions.

I'm not sure how Apple providing software to bypass their security to the fbi equates to everybody having access to the same backdoor access.

I'm an android user. I truly hate the Apple interface and lack of third party apps. My android has been customized to my liking including security upgrade. With that said, after researching Apple's factory security software, I'm impressed.

Our cell phones are our lives. We use them for communication, where we've traveled, photos of what we do and our hobbies. We give up some of our privacy to companies when we agree to their terms of service. Google knows more about us then our families do.

San Bernadine was a terrible attack but that shouldn't give big brother the right to violate our right to privacy. The Boston marathon bombing happened in my backyard. I remember a lot of the actions from big brother that was not being correctly reported after the attack. A lot of scary sh#t from being attacked and the response immediately after.

We as a nation need to decide what is more important, right to privacy or national security. The constitution gives us the right to privacy but the founding fathers could never have guessed how much we as a nation have changed. I'm on the right to privacy side but fear that's not the current generations views.
 

The Champ

Veteran Member
Sep 14, 2000
5,667
MN
camaro75LT said:
We as a nation need to decide what is more important, right to privacy or national security. The constitution gives us the right to privacy but the founding fathers could never have guessed how much we as a nation have changed. I'm on the right to privacy side but fear that's not the current generations views.

When you commit murder, you forfeit your right to privacy. Every single thing you have ever done is opened up to public scrutiny.

With that basis in mind, I enjoy my right to privacy.

But to worry about the privacy of a dead man that committed 14 murders doesn't make sense to me.

Apple needs to comply with the court order.
 

Z28PILOT

Veteran Member
Lifetime Gold Member
Oct 8, 2009
2,311
Emerald Isle , NC
I hope they don't give it up.

The time has come to stop goverment intrusion with threats for everything. People abusing power .

I hate a police state .
 

BonzoHansen

Administrator
Lifetime Gold Member
Jun 1, 2005
21,229
Scott from Hamilton, NJ
I see this as an interesting bit of info, in this particular case the owner of the phone wants it unlocked too. The phone is owned by the county, not the dead douchemonkey. In that light if they can do it I don't see why Apple won't open it. So I'm not sure any rights are being trampled. Although I totally understand the whole rights argument.

And yes, if I am using a piece of company equipment I expect to have ZERO privacy rights. If you don't like it buy your own equipment.
 




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