Bodywork question

Scatter

Veteran Member
Jun 26, 2003
2,300
Millbrook, Al
Hey guys, Just curious to see how y'all work your curves in your body filler.

I had to do some filler work, but I can't seem to get the curves just right. How do you do it? I have been using an 11" durablock to block it out. I covered it with rattle can primer to do a final block with. Don't worry, it will be sanded off and covered with epoxy. I just wanted a visual to see how it looked.

Gotta hand it to you guys that do this for a living......This is tough work.:confused:

Here are a few pictures

1-1.jpg


2-1.jpg


3-1.jpg
 

krabben1

Veteran Member
Lifetime Gold Member
May 16, 2007
8,454
( . Y . )Delco
I have the durablocks too,and I have like a long board thats two inches wide by 14 inches or something.Its flexible and excepts pre cut sheets of sandpaper.Its good for slight curves.
 

Rick WI

Veteran Member
Jul 9, 2001
10,400
Madison, WI
It's almost impossible to explain well and much easier to show.

Work a section of the quarter. Sand off the primer to bare steel and on the upper part of the quarter from front to back, between the sail panel and the beltline/wheelhouse, skim coat a thin layer of bondo front to back. Use enough pressure to set it into the low areas but make sure the final passes smooth it as much as possible and it's somewhat feathered down towards the wheel opening, not slathered down to that point in other words.

Spray a mist of black primer on the bondo and let it all dry an hour or so.

Long board front to back using a criscross pattern with your long board and light pressure. I use pretty coarse paper to knock things down. 60 isn't out of the question. Run the criss cross pattern with the longboard beyond the top portion of the fill are and the bottom on both strokes. Alternate criscross going from front to back and back to front until it flattens out. USE LIGHT PRESSURE and let the paper do the work, otherwise you'll not get a flat panel.

A tip on the filler to make life easier, just use enough hardener to get the filler to change color through and through. In other words you can likely use about 1/3 what you are and get more working time with the filler.

Those low areas are not that deep so the amount of filler isn't going to have to be that thick.
 

Rick WI

Veteran Member
Jul 9, 2001
10,400
Madison, WI
Also, a 20 some inch durablock would make that job MUCH faster. I can't remember how long mine is but it's more than 20 and less than 25. Almost impossible to do door quickly without a block that long, let alone a hood.
 

Scatter

Veteran Member
Jun 26, 2003
2,300
Millbrook, Al
Thanks for the input guys, I do appreciate it!! I have the panel pretty much flat......For the most part.

The main problem area is the curve at the top where it transitions from vertical to horizontal. I just can't seem to get it right. Like in the bottom picture I posted.

Thanks for the tip on the longer board.....It is taking too long with this smaller board.
 

Rick WI

Veteran Member
Jul 9, 2001
10,400
Madison, WI
I see low spots 3/4 of the way down from the "curve area" you are talking about as well as just below/in front of the lower hole for the spoiler.

You need to skim that area with filler. Run the long board almost off the edge of the "curved" area. DON"T go into the flat horizontal part of the fender. Work the vertical dimension

Once you have that vertical area flat don't worry about the top. For the top portion of the curve the easiest way to get that sharp and straight would be with high build. Lay 3 coats of high build just down that area, about 6 inch wide from the curve into the quarter toward the sail panel. Block that primer area flat to get the body line straight and the primer edge feathered toward the sail panel/trunk side. THEN run the long board OVER the body line to get the rounding of the original stamping. That only takes a few blockings front to back and back to front. All blocking done in crisscross pattern alternating front to back and visa versa
 

JOE1980DIRTe

New Member
Mar 6, 2009
16
OP, Kansas
if you are having a hard time with judging high and low spots i use the rule "if you can feel it you will be able to see it" (in the finished product). lay your hand as flat as possible and go back and forth in all directions if you want a good feel of high or low spots because without the right light they can be difficult to see. :)
 

Scatter

Veteran Member
Jun 26, 2003
2,300
Millbrook, Al
Thanks again for the advice guys. I went and bought a 24" block and it was amazing to see how many low spots there really were (about 6) What was even more surprising was the low spots the 11" board didn't show. Time for another skim coat of glaze. :)

Hey Joe, I have a hard time feeling with my bare hand, so I use a couple layers of paper towels. For some reason it helps me feel a little better
 

Scatter

Veteran Member
Jun 26, 2003
2,300
Millbrook, Al
Yep, I'm using Rage Gold and UPOL Dolphin glaze. Good stuff!

By the way, you were dead on with the low spots you saw in the pictures. I wish I could see that well.
 
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