Can someone help me understand this wiring diagram?

Discussion in 'Car Audio, Electronics & Security' started by tlongwel, Mar 26, 2015.

  1. tlongwel

    tlongwel Veteran Member

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    I am attempting to install this amp with 2 front speakers, 2 rears and my aftermarket headunit(pioneer). I know where some of them should go, but others are confusing me. What is 'switched positive'? Does it run inline with my ignition? And what about the 'Battery B+' terminal?

    And what are your thoughts on the speaker outputs...I know there is a CENTER and BASS speaker output, but I don't have that. Should I tie those into another speaker output, or just cap them off?

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  2. dale68z

    dale68z Veteran Member

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    B+ is battery, make sure you have a fuse for it.
    switched power is power that is turned off when the amp is off, has power when the amp is on (ignition switched)
     
  3. tom3

    tom3 Veteran Member

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    Good source for the B+ is sometimes the cigarette lighter. Not sure on those speaker hookups, do you have a Bose system in the car now? Those have amplifiers at each speaker and don't work too well with a standard head unit. What model stereo is the Pioneer? Many are equipped to run four speakers from 4 separate connections at the head unit. I'm confused as to what you are actually doing here.
     
  4. tlongwel

    tlongwel Veteran Member

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    I am upgrading the speakers in my car. I pulled this amp along with 2 fronts and 2 rears as a working system. Everything except the rear speakers are bose. The picture is the factory harness from the donor car that plugs into the amp.

    My pioneer was an upgrade from my stock headunit, dont remember the model at the moment but it does have all the hookups for speakers at all four corners. I could just swap out the speakers and be done with it, but I want my system to have a little more "oomph". Therefore, I want to wire in the Bose amp - which really shouldnt be too hard.

    I figure I can basically run my headunit harness into the amp, and the amp to the speakers. But now that I am looking at it a little more, what the heck is a 'line out' for the front and rear from radio? there are positive and negative wires that run out..but no "line out"?:confused:
     
  5. jthomas

    jthomas Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    The "line out" refers to the low voltage RCA preamp outputs from the head unit which go to the amp. DO NOT connect speaker outputs from the head unit to the Line Output (from radio) connectors which feed the Bose amp.

    If you haven't already, I suggest you do more research to be sure the Bose amp will work with your head unit and speakers. I don't know about the newer Bose stuff but in my experience the Bose amps have their own requirements for voltage input from a head unit and speaker ohm loads. You don't want to send the wrong preamp voltage or connect the wrong speaker loads or you may burn it up. You also need to be sure you can run that amp without the center channel. I'm not sure you can. DON'T try tying speaker outputs to each other...that won't end well.

    If you find the Bose system can accept the Pioneer preamp voltage and the speakers are of the right load, and you get everything hooked up correctly, only then should you turn the system on.
     
  6. tlongwel

    tlongwel Veteran Member

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    LOL, don't worry I wasn't planning on tying together the speaker outputs. I just don't understand where the line outs come from...I mean I have RCA outputs but they aren't solid wire. Maybe I could plug one end in the headunit, strip the other end of the "plug" and connect it to the amp. Maybe thats what it wants? I will do as much research as I can...but it isn't worth much so if it goes bad then...oh well! :p
     
  7. jthomas

    jthomas Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I believe you can do what you said. The center wire in the RCA line is the low voltage power out. The braided wire around it is the ground shield. I don't know enough about how The RCA ground works on a Pioneer, but I am thinking you could just tie all the RCA grounds together and feed that to #6. Research that before you try it because I am not sure that's okay to do. You may pick up some noise by unshielding the output where you pull the braided grounds away from the center wire, but you'll find out. Curious to see how you make out.
     
  8. AJ_72

    AJ_72 Veteran Member

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    In my experience, you'd be just as satisfied with an aftermarket amplifier, and it'll be a lot less of a headache.

    Unless you pulled the Bose amp from the exact same car and the speaker locations are exactly the same, it's gonna sound weird. Bose set up the systems based on the car.

    I once had a '99 Olds Intrigue with the Bose system and replaced the factory head unit with an aftermarket. I just used a LOC* to step the voltage down so I didn't damage anything.

    The first thing I noticed was the system is set up in a very odd way. After I install every new head unit, I always go through the fader and balance settings to listen to each speaker separately, to make sure there are no problems. The first thing I found out was, the RR woofer and the RF tweeter were on the same channel. The LF woofer and the RR tweeter were hooked on the same channel. Etc.

    I guess, instead of using DSP they just switch a few speakers around to give the illusion of a better sound when really all it does is sound different. Most people think because it sounds different then it must be better.

    Keep in mind, this wasn't something I did wrong. This was the way the speakers (stock Bose) were hooked to the amplifier. I don't know if the factory head unit sounded that way because I never had any reason to check each speaker like that, before.

    Not trying to discourage you. Just trying to relieve you of future headaches.

    *This is the LOC I used

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