Dry or Wet filter element?

Discussion in 'High Tech Retrofits' started by Goat, Mar 18, 2018.

  1. Goat

    Goat Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Bought a bunch of stuff to fabricate my air intake tubing, filter, etc. I ended up with a cone shaped filter from Spectra that is oil-impregnated. Going to enclose it in a box with an opening underneath behind the bumper. Then I was reading the instructions that came with the GM engine harness and it says to use a dry element filter - something about getting the proper fuel needed or something (don't have the instructions in front of me).

    Is that a big deal?
     
  2. Gary S

    Gary S Administrator Lifetime Gold Member

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    The factory used dry filters in most applications for many years. Their reasons are likely something we can't find today. Wet filters are going to be higher maintence as they collect dust faster than dry so more maintenance is required. Most people don't maintain their cars anymore than necessary to get them to run until the last payment is made and they can junk the car, so that would make sense.
    Also, my thinking is that an oil impregnated filter would put some oil fumes into the fuel mixture which could be bad for emissions and for the computer system to deal with.
    Whenever you consider doing mods of any kind, keep in mind that factory recommendations are always your best way to go unless you know that you have more knowledge than their buildings full of engineers who made those recommendations. An amateur guess is never as good as a quality engineer's recommendation.
     
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  3. CAMeeks

    CAMeeks Veteran Member

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    You could just clean your filter and not recharge the oil in it. Making it a dry filter.
     
  4. Goat

    Goat Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Agreed. But being an engineer myself, I was taught to always ask why...
     
  5. Goat

    Goat Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Yea, that thought crossed my mind. Usually though the wet filters are cotton or the like, and dry filters are paper. Just wondering if maybe the cotton ones were not as effective without the oil...

    Again, maybe I'm being retarded, but I always ask why.;)
     
  6. largestar

    largestar Member

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    Cotton needs oil to filter properly. The main reason your app calls for dry is the map sensor. Some over oil their filters and it causes issues with the electronics. I use k and n on every car I have and they do work well. The only exception is an f350 a power stroke diesel. In that I use an aftermarket intake and dry filter. Side note- if you want to see how well your filter works, smear a thin film of grease on your intake tube. It will collect particles your filter misses, if any.
     
  7. Joekool

    Joekool Veteran Member

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    If the EFI system you're using has a MAF sensor, an oil impregnated air filter will contaminate the MAF and cause it to read wrong.

    Dry, paper filters just do a better job filtering the air. The oil impregnated ones advertise higher flow because they're more porous. You're literally sacrificing engine life for a minuscule performance gain...
     
  8. badazz81z28

    badazz81z28 Veteran Member

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    ^^ actually the MAF sensor. Excess oil can mess them up. Many automobiles in the aftermarket seeking a little more performance are using oil impregnated filters like K&N. Spectre is another one which I use. These filters work fine as long as you follow the directions and not overly saturate it with oil. On the other end you will be just fine with a quality paper element too. You might lose some HP potential, but it can’t be much.


    You don’t need to have a engineering degtee to ask logical questions. Anyone who has a lot of money in their build is going to double check things. I like where you’re going with the intake filter location.
     
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  9. largestar

    largestar Member

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    I’ve only seen electronics issues with an over oiled filter, never one that was maintained according to instructions. I have seen increased fuel mileage and power with an oiled cotton filter. It is true a cotton filter is more porous, that is why they need oil to function properly. You will never damage your engine in a lifetime of cotton filters.
     
  10. Goat

    Goat Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Thanks guys for the feedback. Sounds like the cotton ones are ok as long as you don't over do it. I'll have to chew on this a little longer...
     
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