Garage cost

Bandit723

Veteran Member
Oct 1, 2016
4,177
Waupaca WI
Yeah health issues scared me into moving in closer to town. it was a good 30 minute ride to anywhere. Also living so far out could be a bit inconvenient 1 hr round trip just to go back and pickup the coffee you forgot while shopping the first time.
 

Gary S

Administrator
Lifetime Gold Member
Apr 14, 1999
24,520
Bismarck, North Dakota
If $100 a square foot is today's cost, then my garage I built in 2004 would today cost $115,200. If you drop the last zero off that price, you get what it cost to build in 2004. :whine:
 

Zstar

Veteran Member
Mar 23, 2014
2,978
Ocala, Florida
Yeah health issues scared me into moving in closer to town. it was a good 30 minute ride to anywhere. Also living so far out could be a bit inconvenient 1 hr round trip just to go back and pickup the coffee you forgot while shopping the first time.
30 minute ride to the ER and a Wendy's cheeseburger just does not cut it for me.
And I get more forgetful every day. Where are my damn keys? LOL!!
 

The Champ

Veteran Member
Sep 14, 2000
5,667
MN
Well, the "Garage Majal" house I posted is not going to happen. Loved all the garage space - you could easily fit 6 cars per level. But..... the access to get vehicles into the garage is extremely limited because of the driveway design. The two stalls on the right side of the photo only have about 16' of concrete to finagle your way in because of the retaining wall.

Garage Majal.jpg

The two stalls on the right are almost unusable as there is so little room because of the retaining wall. Best way to use those stalls would require backing in (owner had a Corvette that backed in in one stall and a motorcycle in the other). Just wouldn't want to deal with difficult access even on the other two stalls.

Besides that, the kitchen layout would have required a total gut job to be functional ($50 - 80,000). It also needed a new roof (guessing at least $30,000 for that). Master bedroom was huge (liked that), but was right off the front door (didn't like that) and the master closet was too small (especially considering the size of the bedroom).

Other than those minor details, it could have worked.
 

Dan Videoman

Member
Nov 16, 2019
71
One piece of advice would be to get a really good concrete guy. The only thing I would have done different on my building would have been to go thicker slab and with bigger rebar. My part of Texas the ground shifts a lot and I had cracks appearing within the first 2 years the slab was down. Now 8 years later, there are some even larger cracks still appearing. I really wish I would have spent the few hundred extra back then, which would have made for a much better slab today. A good concrete guy can ensure you have the proper dirt work, a few inches of cushion sand, and a good perimeter beam to hold the weight of the structure, topping it off with a 6" slab. 6" may seem like overkill, but the cost difference between pouring 4" thick and 6" thick on your size shop probably only amounts to an additional 2 yards of concrete, so might add $250-$300 to the cost of the slab. The old adage of doing it right the first time should count double when it comes to your foundation.



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Just have the fiberglass strands put in it. With the longer strand stuff u don't need rebar. That's from my area building department.
 




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