Gimme the subframe connector skinny, please!

Discussion in 'Suspension, Steering, Brake & Wheel Topics' started by slayer021175666, Jan 13, 2021.

  1. slayer021175666

    slayer021175666 Veteran Member

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    I don't know much about them. I see they make the car flex less. Are bolt ons from jegs ok? What's the lowdown on 'em?
     
  2. Lowend

    Lowend Administrator. .a car, a man, a maraca. Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    First - read this https://nastyz28.com/threads/general-suspension-brakes-wheel-stickies-in-here.103596/

    Now here's the cliff notes:
    You have to weld in SFCs for them to work right. Some guys will get bolt-in style and weld them in afterwards. Bolt-in's WILL have the bolt holes elongate over time.

    For SFC's to be effective you need to replace the factory subframe (body mount) bushings first with a poly or solid style. No one really uses poly anymore. Stay away from the lowering subframe bushings, they are more trouble than they are worth

    The really good subframe connectors require you to channel the floorplan. It's A LOT more work, and probably not worth it on a streetcar.

    The best Subframe connectors for these cars (in no particular order)
    Global West
    Custom Works
    Pro-touring F-Body
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2021
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  3. slayer021175666

    slayer021175666 Veteran Member

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    What do the solid body bushings do?
     
  4. dave@ztech

    dave@ztech Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    You are trying to make the entire frame Ridgid to remove flex, and installing solid bushings will help you get there
     
  5. Zspoiler

    Zspoiler Veteran Member

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    That depends on what you are going to do with the car .And where you drive it most of the time .Solid bushings are more for the race track and rubber and urethane are better for the street.Because of the "flex" needed for the "wonderful" roads we drive in these days.
     
  6. BonzoHansen

    BonzoHansen Administrator Lifetime Gold Member

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    IMO you either do rubber OE style and no SFCs or you do solid mounts and SFCs. Either flex is ok or it isn't. I am firmly in the no flex camp, even for a street car. I guess I'd put the poly ones in the rubber/no SFC column.
     
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  7. G72Zed

    G72Zed Veteran Member

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    It will make the suspension actually work the way it should, not to mention driver feedback and improved confidence on what the car will do.

    The reason why OEM's work to improve the chassis rigidity every year, they brag about it...even if it's 5 -20% improvement over the same as the year before.

    To a point, "nice roads=nice ride, rough roads=rough ride".

    I have found that a top quality shock that's digressively valve'd and dbl adjustable makes a big difference. I have driven 2nd gen's with new rubber/urethane bushings everywhere and regular shocks and it rode rougher than my car with solid body bushings, with no rubber/urethane anywhere and solid engine mounts.
     
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  8. BonzoHansen

    BonzoHansen Administrator Lifetime Gold Member

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    ^^what he said
     
  9. tom3

    tom3 Veteran Member

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    Much like third gens, the front frame is solid mounted to the body. But they mostly ride like crap and noisy as heck with any decent performance tires. Need some good sounding mufflers to put up with it.
     
  10. Lowend

    Lowend Administrator. .a car, a man, a maraca. Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    The rough ride from solid subframe bushings is a wife's tale. Solid chassis means motion is forced through the suspension, where it is sprung and damped by the shocks.
    Gz2Zed is 100% correct.

    The biggest thing that makes a C5 Corvette handle better than the C4 is chassis rigidity.

    The 3rd gen suspension has nothing in common with the 2nd gen. They can't be compared
     
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