Grandson's First Hurricane....

Discussion in 'The BS Topic' started by The Champ, Sep 17, 2020.

  1. The Champ

    The Champ Veteran Member

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    He will literally travel with the plane as I understand it, so won't be assigned to any type of fighter. He will receive underwater training in Pensacola so that if his plane has to ditch in the ocean he knows how to survive a forced water landing/crash. He literally will have to find his way out of a submerged fuselage.
     
  2. Zspoiler

    Zspoiler Veteran Member

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    Then its probably C-130 .CV-22 and or a helicopter since he is probably aircrew.
     
  3. The Champ

    The Champ Veteran Member

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    Z

    I said I'd probably slaughter the Marine terminology... I think Aircrew is what he's going to be doing.
     
  4. Da-bigguy

    Da-bigguy Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I've had similar type training for working in the offshore oil and gas industry. Most transport offshore is by helo these days so you have to conduct evac training on a regular basis, at least every four years at a minimum, sometimes every two years. They have a training system that simulates a helo that you strap into that they then drop into the water and it will rotate so you are sitting underwater, upside down. You are trained that once it stops moving, you push out the window beside you, keeping one hand on the window sill, you then use your other hand to unstrap your seat belts then use both hands to pull yourself out of the fuselage and swim to the surface. They now have a system that lets you rebreath your own air for a short period of time, giving extra time to get out and away. I would be curious to know if the military training he will have to do will be pretty much the same.

    Here's a short Youtube video that illustrates one of the training simulators used.

     
  5. ChevyReb

    ChevyReb Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Screenshot_20200918-221532_Chrome.jpg I was in the path of Hugo in '89. Large trees down in yard very fortunate they didn't land on the house. Heard three tornados. One ripped out a path through the pine forrest across the road. Like another said I won't be hanging around if another has my area in its sites. We were inland 75 miles between left two lines on pic. Almost 31 years ago to the day.

    Hope your grandson is well!
     
  6. Jimmac

    Jimmac Veteran Member

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    lived in okinawa for 5.5 years, had typhoon season every year, Base housing was built out of cement so the wind didn't really do anything. i remember being dragged flying a kite during a typhoon. jim
     
  7. grzewnicki

    grzewnicki Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    The "dunker"! I did that back in 88, was a bit more confined than that one, like a huge 55 gal drum with seats along the sides, reminded more of a CH-46 helo, about 5 or 6 of us in there. First two times were not bad, the last two you wore goggles that were blacked out, fun getting out when you are in full flight gear, guy in front of mee kicked me in the face with his flight boots, luckily underwater it wasn't that hard. Every time I rode in a helo after that I always tried to sit close to a door, or window, immediately after strapping in identified exits and hand holds to use to get out (you always keep hold of something when exiting in a perfect scenario). Good training. Around that time they came up with HEELS-Helo Emergency Egrees Lighting system, when rotor RPM dropped to 96% it illuminated and outlined each exit with a ribbon light, sort of like todays LED ribbon lights. We lost a SH-3H helo off San Diego and no one got out. I was assigned the task of pulling all the HEELS control boxes out of the wreck, for the investigation. I knew that aircraft like the back of my hand, but that mangled wreckage it took me a while to find all the boxes. SIde note it was only in the water about a month, the Main Gearbox is magnesium, the 1.5" thick feet had corroded off in that short amount of time, magnesium and salt water = instant corrosion, magnesium is made by evaporating saltwater to get the magnesium out, it wants to return to its original state and it doesn't take long.
     
  8. Zspoiler

    Zspoiler Veteran Member

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    When I was there in 1977 at Camp Foster when I was in the Marine Corps. .The barracks were made out of concrete ,We put lockers against the windows then the bunk beds against those for protection, And just before it hit I had to drive the Northern Training area and back in an M-561 Gamma Goat with no top .and no windshield in the dark,With just a set of googles ad a helmet.It was a very nasty drive.
     
  9. The Champ

    The Champ Veteran Member

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    Your description matches what Keagan told me about his underwater training prior to reporting for boot camp back in March.

    BTW, heard from Keagan this morning. He's tired from spending most of his time doing hurricane cleanup on base.
     

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