Help from body gurus!

Discussion in 'Body Restoration' started by TX79Z28, Jul 2, 2014.

  1. TX79Z28

    TX79Z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 3, 2007
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    That's the way it was when I stripped it with 40gr discs, trust me the drivers door was MUCH worse! I sanded it to 80 before spraying epoxy and 2k
     
  2. TX79Z28

    TX79Z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 3, 2007
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    1981g, the other approach I was thinking about was that the wheel arch/lip is slightly "low" and could use building up more. If you look at the before pics, it was almost gone, maybe I need to build it up and work on bumping the "high ridge" and filling it? Not sure if I'm explaining it right
     
  3. 77nomad

    77nomad Veteran Member

    Messages:
    2,123
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
    Location:
    Ski Town
    Edge cut is the areas where you had to add filler just to fill "sanding" marks. They are actually grinding marks. You have the high spot. It needs to be worked down with a body hammer. IMHO
     
  4. 70-SS/RS-L78

    70-SS/RS-L78 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,681
    Likes Received:
    69
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2003
    Location:
    Phila area
    I hope you are going to weld up them holes where some hack used a dent puller.
    Mark



    .
     
  5. 1981gMachine

    1981gMachine Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,505
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2005
    Location:
    Airville, PA
    To be fair, this is a blanket statement. You don't know when this repair was done. The stud gun hasn't been around for ever and this was common practice to repair dents. Actually, the early days of body filler, holes helped it grip the panel.

    as for the OP, did you block it yet? You have nothing to loose by blocking it. If you sand through and hit metal, stop. Then use your body hammer to knock down the high spots. Then block again and stop when you re hit the metal spots.

    My favorite hammer is like the one below

    [​IMG]

    Using the "pick" end of the hammer. You can tap down high spots and works well in concave areas. I'd suggest if you do some tapping, to hold the fender lip with your non hammer hand. This is to keep the panel steady while you tap down the highs.

    Light blows, start out lightly and if it doesn't seem to be moving then a few heavier hits. But stop to check it after each heavier blow to feel for progress. If you are unsatisfied with the progress of knocking down the high. You can hold a dolly behind the hammer point. However, in doing so a lighter hit is needed as you're concentrating the blow more effectively.

    I still suggest blocking it 1st. Block until you reach metal. This leaves a good road map of what to do next. Because you'll be left with Metal (high spots), sanded primer (good area), and unsanded spots (low spots).

    I know this part could be frustrating but patience is key. Block the area in sections. Block the flat 1/2" lip, block the body, and finesse the contour that connects the two.

    Remember, you can't fill high spots.
     
  6. TX79Z28

    TX79Z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 3, 2007
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    1981g, that's awesome advice! I will start blocking as soon as I finish the doors. As I said before, the wheel arch "lip" also needs to be built up, but I can do that when I fix this "boo boo"

    Thanks again !
     
  7. 70-SS/RS-L78

    70-SS/RS-L78 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,681
    Likes Received:
    69
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2003
    Location:
    Phila area
    This is true thats why we used to weld washers to the panel and we fabricated a hook on the dent puller. We also used vice grips with a big washer welded to the end and use them when we needed to tack a plate to the car to pull bigger dents. I was taught by a guy who was a Perfectionist and he made it clear that we were to never put holes in a panel so I never got into the habit of doing it. If you must do it at least weld them up when your done pulling it. I remember watching a body man who had a air chisel with a pointy bit and he started punching holes in a quarter panel. Then he would use fiberglass to cover the holes. What a Hack!! I have seen some real butchers in my day. I have never heard that Putting holes would help hold the filler on the panel. Im just gonna have to take your word on that cause I have never done it. Back in the day I would use a 24 grit grinding disk.
    Mark
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2014
  8. 77nomad

    77nomad Veteran Member

    Messages:
    2,123
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
    Location:
    Ski Town
    This is what I meant by "bumping" and "using a hammer."
     
  9. TX79Z28

    TX79Z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 3, 2007
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    I hate the thought of banging on the quarter after being "done", but in reality, I am NOT done...so whats a little more filler, more primer, and more sanding! I'm so much into this project time-wise, that another 2 hours is no biggie!
     
  10. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

    Messages:
    6,394
    Likes Received:
    149
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Exactly, the fact that it's bothering you now means it will only be worse if you do nothing. I am sure after a little tapping, filling and sanding it will look spot on.
     

Share This Page