Jamieg285's '79 in the UK

jamieg285

Veteran Member
Jul 15, 2004
1,333
Luton, England
Welcome to anyone else that's made it this far through the thread - appearing on the Trending thread email has done wonders for the views.

Thanks to all for the encouraging comments, it helps to know I'm not on my own with this.
 

NotUniqueEnough

Veteran Member
Lifetime Gold Member
Feb 25, 2007
272
Lost
First off, Impressive work on a huge endeavor. My hats off to you sir!

Second. I'm glad my car does not need that much metal work!

Just finished the EFI install in mine with tank replacement next is complete interior and weather stripping. and all new window moldings.
 

SPJ65M

New Member
Sep 16, 2011
4
Gloucestershire, UK
Congratulations on your dedication.
I’m on the last leg of my uk rebuild, lots of welding and panel replacement etc etc, one bit leads to another and on it goes.
Fortunately started with a single garage to work in but lost that and had to work on the drive in front of the house.
UK weather and shipping prices as you well know make it a challenge..!
Have now put a garage tent up to final assemble it.

Keep up the good work, it’s so satisfying when you start putting it all together for the final time.
 

jamieg285

Veteran Member
Jul 15, 2004
1,333
Luton, England
Spring is finally here, the weather has improved and it's time to get out on the car again.

As with most years, I've had a bit of a winter project going where the jobs can be done inside the garage (which seems to be ever shrinking as I gather more parts). This year there was someone in the UK that was looking for some stock a-arm cross shafts. Knowing that I was going to be replacing mine with offset ones, it seemed like a good time to look at replacing the bushes and shafts.

Sadly I didn't take any progress pics, but in order to get the bushes out I bought a cheap ball joint press and cut a slot in the receiving end of it, so it would slot over the center shaft. Getting the bushes out was hard work with the manual press, but all-in-all, easier than I was expecting.
Oddly, the front bushes on both sides had problems with the rubber separating from the inner sleeve, with the latter having to be carefully cut and chiselled off.

With the bushes out I attacked them with a wire brush in a drill and cleaned them up. They've now been coated in epoxy and I'll look at fitting the del-alums and new cross-shafts next time it rains and I can't work outside. I think I'll need to fab up some small support brackets to help push them in.
AArms.jpg



Back to the car itself, work continued with the repairs to the trunk floor. I can't find the progress pics for this, so will have to make do with the current state, where the floor has been welded up, cleaned and trunk/tail support piece welded in.
TrunkTailSupport.jpg


With that corner now done it's time to start on the passenger side. I don't want to weld the tail panel in until both trunk drop-offs are done. As with the other side, the first job is the outer wheel house. First job is to cut the quarter further up to give me access to the full flange.
RightOuterBefore.jpg


I wanted to do the repairs to the inner panel first, getting it structurally sound before removing/attaching the new outer wheel house. To make this easier I trimmed off the bulk of the panel. I had a leave a large chunk intact at the front, where I previously did my own patch work. This will need carefull removing.
RightOuter2.jpg


I could see that the rear section of the inner panel was a bit rusted, so I needed to start removing some of the remains of the outer panel to see how much would need replacing. A (un)welcome return of the spot weld cutter...
RightOuterHoles.jpg


Thankfully it was just the last few inches, so I was able to concentrate fully on the repairs to the inner panel. First off I dug out the replacement panel and primed it both sides in the area I'd be cutting out.
DonorPainted.jpg


To make sure the patch would be the right size and fitment, I cut a card template from the new panel, using the indents as a guide. I could then offer it up to the old panel and make sure it was suitable fit.
CardPatch1.jpg

CardPatch2.jpg


Once happy, I marked where to cut on the donor panel, and then cut it out. This was then offered up to the old panel and a line drawn around it.
InnerMarked.jpg


This was then cut out, allowing me to see what repairs are needed behind it.
InnerCut2.jpg


Looks like as well as some of the tail panel lip needing some repairs, I'll have to do some work on the shock tower
ShockTower.jpg



Till next time...
 

hubedobeedo

3rd times a charm
Jul 18, 2013
864
Huntertown,IN
Spring is finally here, the weather has improved and it's time to get out on the car again.

As with most years, I've had a bit of a winter project going where the jobs can be done inside the garage (which seems to be ever shrinking as I gather more parts). This year there was someone in the UK that was looking for some stock a-arm cross shafts. Knowing that I was going to be replacing mine with offset ones, it seemed like a good time to look at replacing the bushes and shafts.

Sadly I didn't take any progress pics, but in order to get the bushes out I bought a cheap ball joint press and cut a slot in the receiving end of it, so it would slot over the center shaft. Getting the bushes out was hard work with the manual press, but all-in-all, easier than I was expecting.
Oddly, the front bushes on both sides had problems with the rubber separating from the inner sleeve, with the latter having to be carefully cut and chiselled off.

With the bushes out I attacked them with a wire brush in a drill and cleaned them up. They've now been coated in epoxy and I'll look at fitting the del-alums and new cross-shafts next time it rains and I can't work outside. I think I'll need to fab up some small support brackets to help push them in.
AArms.jpg



Back to the car itself, work continued with the repairs to the trunk floor. I can't find the progress pics for this, so will have to make do with the current state, where the floor has been welded up, cleaned and trunk/tail support piece welded in.
TrunkTailSupport.jpg


With that corner now done it's time to start on the passenger side. I don't want to weld the tail panel in until both trunk drop-offs are done. As with the other side, the first job is the outer wheel house. First job is to cut the quarter further up to give me access to the full flange.
RightOuterBefore.jpg


I wanted to do the repairs to the inner panel first, getting it structurally sound before removing/attaching the new outer wheel house. To make this easier I trimmed off the bulk of the panel. I had a leave a large chunk intact at the front, where I previously did my own patch work. This will need carefull removing.
RightOuter2.jpg


I could see that the rear section of the inner panel was a bit rusted, so I needed to start removing some of the remains of the outer panel to see how much would need replacing. A (un)welcome return of the spot weld cutter...
RightOuterHoles.jpg


Thankfully it was just the last few inches, so I was able to concentrate fully on the repairs to the inner panel. First off I dug out the replacement panel and primed it both sides in the area I'd be cutting out.
DonorPainted.jpg


To make sure the patch would be the right size and fitment, I cut a card template from the new panel, using the indents as a guide. I could then offer it up to the old panel and make sure it was suitable fit.
CardPatch1.jpg

CardPatch2.jpg


Once happy, I marked where to cut on the donor panel, and then cut it out. This was then offered up to the old panel and a line drawn around it.
InnerMarked.jpg


This was then cut out, allowing me to see what repairs are needed behind it.
InnerCut2.jpg


Looks like as well as some of the tail panel lip needing some repairs, I'll have to do some work on the shock tower
ShockTower.jpg



Till next time...
i thought mine was rough .my thread update on 71 progress . you are making great progress considering constraints.
 

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jamieg285

Veteran Member
Jul 15, 2004
1,333
Luton, England
I'm overdue an update (again), so what I have been up to for the last 3 months?

I closed off the last update looking at the rust hiding behind the inner quarter, and that was where I carried on. First job was to clean off the rough rust, which did make it look better, but it still needed repairing. Here we are part way through the dis-assembly.
ShockTower1.jpg


When I bought the car the passenger shock wasn't bolted in with the original bolts, but instead had semi-loose studs mounted in the shock tower, which had a tendency to spin when trying to loosen and tighten them, so I thought this would be a good time to fix that. My original assumption was the inner support had been stripped and one or both of the bolts weren't secure enough. I tested this and found the front was OK and would accept an original bolt, but the rear was not just loose, but the hole was much bigger. Once I'd clean off most of the rust, I chopped the top of the tower to get some access inside, but I wasn't expecting to find this:
ShockTower2.jpg

ShockTowerDrilledBolt.jpg


The original bolt had clearly siezed and I guess snapped off. They've then drilled up through it, leaving part of the old bolt there. I set about resolving this by cutting the remainder of the bolt out, sliding a new bolt in from the top and welding it in place. In hindsight I don't think it's the best solution, but I'm committed to it now.
NewShockBolt.jpg


With that done, the repairs to the shock tower had 3 phases - 1. weld up the top flap, 2. repair the front section, which is an extension of the rear seat back panel (not sure what the proper name for that one is). Here we are at that stage:
ShockTowerPartRepair.jpg


The 3rd phase was the replace the top/outer part of the tower. I had the spare tower from the other side spare (I cut the rear section of the rail out for the earlier repairs). Although the other side, it was fairly close in profile and needed minimal work to get it to fit. It's not the tidiest of repairs, but it's not going to be seen where it is.
ShockTowerRepaired.jpg


With that done, I moved onto the small patches along the edge of the trunk floor.
TrunkFloorEdge1.jpg


One of the rough spots was above the support piece, where I'd previously made some pretty rough repairs (from inside the trunk).
TrunkFloorOldPatch.jpg


The old patch was cut out, revealing the support piece, which also needed some repair. Here the thin spot has been removed and I'm ready to weld in the replacement and then the same after it was in and cleaned up.
TrunkFloorSupport1.jpg

TrunkFloorSupport2.jpg


Then I worked on the trunk floor again, initially working out a patch shape with card, and cut/shaped a piece to match it.
TrunkFloorSupportTemplate.jpg

TrunkFloorSupportPatch.jpg


Once I'd got the patch piece ready, I then knew how much to cut out. There is still a rough edge on the left, but this is behind the trunk drop off, so I'll deal with that later.
TrunkFloorSupportPatchCut.jpg


And here we are with the patch welded in and cleaned up.
TrunkFloorSupportPatchIn.jpg


Body side repairs for the inner quarter panel now complete :)
InnerSideComplete.jpg


Now it was back to the inner quarter panel itself. Another test fit showed it wasn't as well cut as I thought, but was close enough to work with. I started by marking where I wanted to spot weld, then cut the holes.
InnerPanelMarked.jpg

InnerPanelCut.jpg


A couple of hours later and it's welded in.
InnerPanelWelded.jpg


Cleaned up and epoxied - one of my best jobs to date, virtually no sign of work being done:
InnerPanelClean.jpg


After that, I spent a couple of hours drilling out the spot welds around the arch and cleaning up the surface behind it. From experience on the other side, I knew that I need to align the outerwheel house and the quarter panel at the same time, I had to dig the quarter skin out and do some prep on that too.

I had to trim the front lower corner a few times, to get it to sit down low enough, but I managed to get it aligned fairly quickly. The crease line is a fraction high here, but will be easy to massage down when being fitted properly. I also noted the passenger door is a few mm low anyway.
InnerOuterTrialFit1.jpg

InnerOuterTrialFit2.jpg


Happy with that I proceded to punch out a ton of holes on the wheel house, clean it off for welding, clamp in place and weld away. Ran out of time to complete the job today, but made a good start.
WheelHouseWelded1.jpg

WheelHouseWelded2.jpg



Till next time, hopefully not in 3 months...
 

jamieg285

Veteran Member
Jul 15, 2004
1,333
Luton, England
Well it wasn't 3 months, but almost 6. Looking back at what little I've achieved in that time is depressing, but at least I am still moving forward.

Back in July I completed the installation of the outer wheel house by cleaning it up and applying epoxy primer to the outside and underside.
OuterPainted.jpg

InnerPainted1.jpg

InnerPainted2.jpg


Next step after that was to move onto the passenger trunk drop off. First task in that job was to remove what was left of the original panel and assess the state of the edge of the trunk panel.
DropOffRemoved.jpg


Initial impressions were that the lip looked good enough to re-use. There was a rough patch at the rear most end, under the tail panel support bracket, but I would be able to sort that. Happy with that, the next step was to trial fit the new panel. Looks OK from the outside:
DropOffTrialOuter.jpg


However, when looking at the edge to the trunk pan, all was not so good. It was OK at the rear, but tapered away to a gap that was too big to be able to squeeze together.
DropOffTrialUnderneath.jpg

DropOffTrialAbove.jpg


After much deliberation on the best way to tackle this, I settled on doing similar to what I'd done on the other side. By removing and replacing the outer section of the trunk pan, I would be able to take advantage of being able to weld the outer piece onto the pan out of the car, where access will be far easier, I'd be able to repair the bad section at the rear, and fill the gap.

Initially I was hoping to be able to gently lift the tail support bracket up on one side and work under it, however as I started this it became clear that the rough patch was bigger than expected and it would be best to remove the bracket completely.
TailSupportBracketOuter.jpg

TailSupportBracketAbove.jpg


You can see here, where the support bracket has been folded up to the right, that the pan was badly rusted underneath it.
TailSupportBracketLifted.jpg


With the tail support bracket out of the way, I started cutting out the bad stuff, going across with past the inner side of the bracket in the end.
TrunkPanCut1.jpg

TrunkPanCut2.jpg

TrunkPanCut3.jpg


Once I was happy, the drop off was put back into position and out with the trusty cereal packet to make up a template.
Template1.jpg


With the template done I found it was bigger than any of the sheet metal I'd salvaged, so for the first time in a few years I had to buy some virgin sheet metal to make the patch. This was then cut to shape and initial bends made, holes drilled and it was ready for trial fitting. As the bumper mounts through this panel, it's important that all of the trial fits/trimming are done with the bumper attached and bolted tight, to pull the panel into place.
PatchTrialFit.jpg


Happy with the trial fit (It will need fettling when it comes to welding), I removed it and started the early prep for welding it, but drilling the holes for the spot welds.
PatchHolesDrilled.jpg



I'm at a stage where I've got a number of areas that need to be cleaned up and epoxied. The list included the rear chassis rail and the right side of the cross rail(which should have been done ages ago, but I'd hidden it with the trunk pan and forgotten about it). The new patch panel will need coating before I start welding too. With the weather being cold at the moment, it's not ideal painting weather and it would need longer to dry. Bearing this in mind, I've decided to get some more parts ready for painting, so I can do more bits at the same time. The first in this of parts is the upper panels that link the tail panel to the quarters and form the trunk gutter. This was currently screwed into place on the tail panel, so this was all removed. This panel will need welding along the trunk gutter, and I don't feel confident about being able to clean the welds out of the gutter, so I've decided to weld from the inner side, effectively welding the tail panel the gutter rather than the other way around. This should make clean up much easier. In preperation for this I've drilled the holes in the trunk pane and cleaned of the epoxy in all areas that will be welded (eventually). It's not overly clear, as there's lots of marker dots on the panel at the moment, but I've drilled out the line along the bottom of the panel in the 2nd pic (panel is upside down, so the holes are actually on the top side of the panel)
TailPanelDrilled1.jpg

TailPanelDrilled2.jpg


A quick squirt of weld through primer was applied and that was it for the day.

The next step will be to clean up the upper panel and prepare it for welding to the tail panel. I think to do this I will have to refit them both to the car to verify the fit is right, tack it in place, then remove them from the car again to complete the welding. A lot of messing around to come!


This time I'm going to put a reminder in my phone so that I actually do post some updates!
 

Jas0n

Veteran Member
Lifetime Gold Member
Apr 27, 2010
1,033
Verona, ITALY
Man that is certainly not a little achievement. We all know how much time it takes doing also the little things, and when you think or programming your time, is always way more that you had considered!

Great job. keep doin'it.
 




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