Looking for tips on spraying metallic paints

Discussion in 'Body Restoration' started by danbrennan, Sep 3, 2012.

  1. danbrennan

    danbrennan Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I've had some problems with tiger striping when painting metallics in the past(although not always), so I wondered what everybody does different painting metallics versus solids? I'm painting my 442 now, which is a dark green metallic.

    From memory, what I've done in the past different with metallics was,

    1) Spray a bit dryer than I would a solid
    2) Increase the fan width
    3) Use glass marbles in the gun cup and gently shake every 30 seconds or so.

    Still the same 50% overlap pattern? Does anyone use a different pressure, or change the amount of reducer?
     
  2. danbrennan

    danbrennan Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Is it my imagination, or is the striping more likely to occur with light metallics, than dark metallics?
     
  3. dwright406

    dwright406 Veteran Member

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    Try spraying with a 75% overlap with metallics, moving the gun a bit faster to avoid overloading the panel.
    After the final coat of base, applying a light "dust coat" from a greater distance will help even out the metallics as well.
     
  4. Mike Bozung

    Mike Bozung Veteran Member

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    My 2 cents : make sure the gun is at a 90* angle to the surface when sprying. If you tilt it at all it will put more paint on one area more than another. Also don't hold the gun to close, it will "flood" one area.
    Another trick to try is. Lets say you spray from "West to East" .After it flash's and you put on another coat. Spray "North to South". This way you should have good coverage all over.
    Don't over reduce. The color will be over thinned.
    Hope this helps.
    Mike
     
  5. 76 camaro car 1

    76 camaro car 1 Veteran Member

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    Lighter color metallic's have more flake because the flake is usually what makes it cover. After you shoot your last coat hold the gun about 12 - 15" away from the surface and spray with a cris cross motion. This is called fogging. A lot of it is just developed technique. You don't want to get the panel to wet or you will have metallic sag or splotchiness but you don't want it to dry either.
     
  6. kawboy

    kawboy Veteran Member

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    Are you spraying a single stage or base clear?
     
  7. earlysecond

    earlysecond Veteran Member

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    make sure that it is not an illusion. When first sprayed, the metallics do settle. I found that gun distance and orientation to the panels was key!

    I am NOT sure that I am convinced but was told by the owner of SPI that the best measure for control of metallics in basecoat is to add a shot glass of clear activator to a quart of basecoat. AGAIN not sure that I can recommend this as it does a couple of other things like increase the flash time of the coat BUT probably does allow for a bit more settling of the particles where it may be a bit too heavy.

    Here is the best advice- get your paint and a junk panel prepped the way that you are going to spray and practice it.

    Finally, FWIW, I sprayed my base a couple of weeks ago with my Iwata LPH 400 and a silver (clear coat cap) I did experience some striping that was a concern but it faded as it flashed. Some of it was technique. Iwata sells a purple cap and needle for base application for that gun and says it provides better metallic control. . .that may have helped.
     
  8. ChevyReb

    ChevyReb Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    My painter used a 75% overlap and stayed a little further ( talking an inch or two here) off the panel than normal. This sprays a little dryer than normal, and softens the paint laying down on the panel. He also angled the gun some too so it was like laying the paint down and not spaying directly down onto the surface. He said that helped to keep the metallics floating on top. It will take more coats to get coverage, but spraying it this way also cuts down on runs and sags too. Like Brent said gun speed is key as well, I don't think you want to be too slow.

    Bear in mind I am barley an amateur so I am going by what I saw my paint guy do and how he explained it to me. Also don't forget to follow the directions on the paint tech sheet.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2012

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