Mini tub kits worth it?

Discussion in 'Suspension, Steering, Brake & Wheel Topics' started by vince72, Oct 22, 2020.

  1. biker

    biker Veteran Member

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    Well that was an excellent article. Very cool to have that kind of attention for you and your car. So how did you like the subframe connectors?
     
  2. G72Zed

    G72Zed Veteran Member

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    Got to ask you Sir, is this the same car and owner that appeared and was featured in the February 2010 issue of Super Chevy under the "Global West" Camaro? Sure does look like it, even has the same bent rear driver's quarter quarter lip going on....except they called you Jerry....

    If so, Your car made it into my "Six Sigma" pre-build "feature" binder as a great example of what can be done with well thought out and functional bolt ons....without spending a fortune.
     
  3. JUNKYARD AUTOCROSSER

    JUNKYARD AUTOCROSSER Member

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    I dont like the Heidts subframe connectors that I tested. I have thought about subframe connectors for years. Being an engineer, i've studied the structural side of their effectiveness and come up with skeptic thoughts. I tested the subframe connectors on skid pads and autoxes. I have no quantitative data to support my position , only subjective "seat of the pants" feeling. In my opinion, they dont work because the stress points are too far apart to provide chassis stiffness. I noticed no improvement in chassis stiffness and no improvement in handling. Also I hated drilling holes in my subframes to mount them. After running the subframe connectors for about a year, I removed them. My car thanked me. lol.
     
  4. JUNKYARD AUTOCROSSER

    JUNKYARD AUTOCROSSER Member

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  5. biker

    biker Veteran Member

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    Ok, thanks! I'm with you on the weight trade off.
    I'm hoping they will be of more use on my t-roof car.
     
  6. JUNKYARD AUTOCROSSER

    JUNKYARD AUTOCROSSER Member

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    Yes, it is, and you have a keen eye to spot that damaged driver side rear wheel well. You also have an amazing memory/recall of the 2010 super chevy issue. I lossed a rear wheel/tire while autoxing and the tire wedged under the wheel well and bent it. I sheared all five lug studs because i installed a 1/2" wheel spacer to get the right offset. Bad Idea. Lesson learned. Never use wheel spacers while autoxing. I've since repaired the wheel well along with a new paint . I use many parts from Global West. This is no nonsense aftermarket suspension co. that designs many excellent products that flat work. My name is Gerald Lum, some people call me Jerry. Take care and stay safe.
     
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  7. mid77z28

    mid77z28 Veteran Member

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    Gerald,
    Did you order your car with no rear spoiler and stripe delete? It looks so cool without it and to add to fellow member previously said about the being in super chevy. I remember your car being in magazines back in the 80s.Glad to see all these years you are still enjoying the car.
    Mike,
     
  8. Fbird

    Fbird Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I would beg to differ on this statement as written.

    Maybe ...never use the wrong type of wheel spacer while auto X"ing... as a proper wheel spacer should 1. be located on the axle hub (not just a spacer) and 2. Support the wheels studs with minimum clearance. 3. Prefer to have it LOCATE the wheel (hubcentric) so the studs are only doing 1 function...holding 2 flat surfaces together.
     
  9. John Wright

    John Wright Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    As for the subframe connectors...my thoughts were that early 2 gens with slicks/power/hard launches would start ripping the sheet metal at the driver's C pillar into the roof at that sharp corner, and also cracking windshields, etc...adding the subframe connectors (in my mind) seemed to keep that from happening. I noticed that the "hinge effect" when jacking the car up went away after adding PTFB subframe connectors, PTFB's type of G-bars, and solid body bushings. Before the stiffening products were added, the car seemed to have a hinge located under the door hinges/cowl/front of the rockers... when jack stands were placed there under the subframe.
     
  10. dcozzi

    dcozzi Veteran Member

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    Gerald, I can see the distance of the attachment points being an issue. That is a great observation. As an engineer, I'm sure you think in terms of sheer, torsional rigidity, load etc. more than the average guy.
    I wonder if welding subframe connectors is really better than bolting them in? I took it further and welded the roll cage hoop to them and the door bar attachment point up front through the floor to the subframe. I wonder if I gained anything? Guess it couldn't hurt.
     

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