Molding is Separating

Discussion in 'The BS Topic' started by bfmgoalie, Dec 11, 2020.

  1. Camarolina

    Camarolina Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I don't have any experience with composite molding if that is what you have or manufactured homes.
    You having such a big attic may be a clue though. That means a lot of open space in your rafters that may allow for some vertical movement without the webbing from rafter to joist.
    It could also be in your foundation. With a wood floor, if you don't have the appropriate girders and/or piers in the right places it could produce stress along certain stretches of wall. The cracks developing in your sheetrock could be a sign of that.

    All of that being said. The way I have fixed this problem in the past is by taking down the crown molding. I have only worked with wood crown molding. If you are carful you can do it without damaging it and the wall or just purchase new crown molding. When you put the molding back up you nail and caulk it to the ceiling only. Do not nail or caulk it to the wall. This will allow the molding to be kinda free flouting. Whether its your ceiling going up and down or your floor going up and down this will fix either. The key to making it look good is a tight fit of the molding against the wall. Because you are not going to nail or caulk the bottom against the wall you don't want to see any real gap.
    In the future if you feel the house has stopped moving you can always go back and nail and caulk the molding to the wall.

    Your gap at the joints, I don't know. If you don't see any separation of sheetrock in the corners I guess it might be the composite contracting.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2020
  2. 1972_Z-28

    1972_Z-28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    House settling, wood drying sounds logical. If sheetrock is cracking I would think there is some type of warranty with a new house.
    In my part of the world we get sinking foundations at about 20-40 yrs. Have to have it leveled out.
    Anyhow hope it nothing major and good luck. Gonna have all of us checking shertrock and corners now haha!!!
     
  3. bfmgoalie

    bfmgoalie Veteran Member

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    #6.jpg

    No sagging what so ever. The opening on the concrete block is where the back wall portion of the garage is built. They left that open to build a opening to a crawl space under the home. After that was completed, the brick was installed to seal that opening. In the crawl space, concrete blocks were installed in sections under the home for support.
     
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  4. bfmgoalie

    bfmgoalie Veteran Member

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    I wasn't aware it was that PVC type material that was used until I painted a guest bedroom. In all honesty, I've assisted in many household projects and even helped build a few homes. Never knew that material was used to make molding. And yes, the molding is nailed to the ceiling and the wall.

    Don't know if this would make a difference causing this. The home is insulated very well. The temp in the home presently is 72 F. The furnace only kicks on occasionally. But you head up into the attic its cold as hell (always wondered about that statement) up there.

    Off the subject, I have a neighbor across the street who leaves his garage door open all day no matter what the temp is. I'm talking -10 F and the door is up. I haven't figured that out yet.
     
  5. Camarolina

    Camarolina Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Another thing to look at is humidity levels. A house needs to breath.
    Roofs should have a way for the air to flow in and out. It looks like you have a vented ridge cap but I don't see gable louvers and can't tell if you have soffit vents. That could be spoiling the air up there.
    Also you might want to check the humidity of the ground under your house. High humidity in the dirt can cause all kinds of problems. This is caused by poor drainage of rain water.

    Leave an anonymous note in your neighbors garage saying, "If I was a thief I could have all you sh!t."
     
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  6. bfmgoalie

    bfmgoalie Veteran Member

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    Excellent points! No gable louvers or soffit vents. Its very humid up there in the summer.

    The note, well, it wouldn't be anonymous. A few couples know I was in jail (twice - only for 2 nights). If the word got out about the note.....:D:D:D:D
     
  7. Zstar

    Zstar Veteran Member

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    All great points and very true! Also, is there a vapor barrier on the ground under the house? I know in Georgia, this was really essential to prevent mildew.
     
  8. Dan Videoman

    Dan Videoman Member

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    Things are still settling out. Wait for spring and the see if it got worse or closed back up. If it does not close up then look at things closely. Don't worry for now.
     
  9. ChevyReb

    ChevyReb Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Are premade stamped trusses used for the roof frame, and if so is it made with SYP (southern yellow pine)? If so google truss uplift. If this is your issue you are up north will compound the problem as temperatures will be more severe from heated space and attic. You may need to look into encapsulating the attic by spray foaming it to reduce the variation of temperature between heated and non heated space. If you are in close proximity to a large body of water and clay soil it can be worse. I wish I didn't know so much about this issue!
     
  10. danbrennan

    danbrennan Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I remember when we built our house, and I bought the wood, they made a point of selling me northern white pine, at least for the roof. I think it cost a bit more(~1990), but they said it was better for colder climates.

    I'm puzzled about no soffit vents. The ridge vent has to be able to pull air from somewhere, otherwise the vent system can't work?
     
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