Need garage help!

Discussion in 'The BS Topic' started by Buck Heard, Feb 19, 2006.

  1. Keizer

    Keizer BANNED

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    I have mentioned this before, and will do it again. Bag the whole ceiling idea that you get with conventional framing, and post frame you garage. If you are dead set on a car lift, there is no better way. Don't add this plate, and subtract this stud length.......Post frame that garage, and you will have no issues.

    Look at this shot of the inside of my shop. I could jack my truck up 12', and still not hit anything.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. REDDEVIL

    REDDEVIL Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    If you are don't want the upstairs storage...yes. And it sounds like building codes may be an issue. My neighborhood doesn't allow them.
     
  3. Keizer

    Keizer BANNED

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    I have upstairs storage in my shop......lots of it!

    I am not knocking conventional framing at all. I have years of experience with both styles of framing.

    Car lifts just work great with post framed structures.
     
  4. Keizer

    Keizer BANNED

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    Alot of people are very nyeve when it comes to post framed buildings. I have people all the time walk into my shop, and are so surprised that the building is framed the way it is. The outside is hardi-plank lap siding with cedar trim, and furred in soffits. From the outside, you would think it was conventionally framed.
     
  5. Cardinal

    Cardinal Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Here's my experience with building my garage: it's 28' wide, 36' deep, and 10' high (8' wood stud conctruction with 2' concrete knee wall--blocks are filled with vermiculite insullation), 10' wide doors that are 9' high.

    Things I'd do different: 14' high (8' wood stud wall with 6' knee wall), 40' deep so as to be able to park two vehicles end to end (believe it or not, that 4' makes a big difference), INSULATED OVERHEAD DOORS--mine aren't and they suck the heat out of the garage like a giant vacuum, and pipe in the floor (plastic) so that it could be heated with a boiler which makes the floor warm (along with the rest of the garage.

    I too am most likely getting a four post lift (even though my son wants a two post). Granted the two post is better for working under the car but it also takes up space in the garage and can't be moved out of the way. The four post takes up more space but with a roller kit, can be move anywhere in the garage.
     
  6. krazy3

    krazy3 Veteran Member

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    I agree with the post frame. I put up a 30 X 40 this past summer, just for my '80 Z28. I put up a Menards kit, then had the floor professionally poured. Much cheaper than a conventional garage. :D
     
  7. Buck Heard

    Buck Heard Veteran Member

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    Thanks for the info guys. The house (and hopefully garage) are going up in a new subdivision. The construction of the garage has to match that of the house and must be 80% brick. So I am fighting a budget mainly. 24x24 with 10ft ceilings might be my limit financially. Hopefully that'll be enough.
     

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