Need help finding a vintage vending resistor

Discussion in 'The BS Topic' started by CamaroMan79, Nov 29, 2010.

  1. CamaroMan79

    CamaroMan79 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Im trying to fix a C-8 Electro cigarette machine from 1948 that was given to me. I believe that is has a bad resistor.

    The resistor has the foloowing info:

    Sprague
    KoolOhm
    10kt-10w
    135 (with an ohm symbol)

    From what I have gathered online the company no longer exists. Does anyone know where i can find some of these resistors, or know of a direct replacement for them?
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2010
  2. Gary S

    Gary S Administrator Lifetime Gold Member

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  3. CamaroMan79

    CamaroMan79 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    What does the 10kt mean?
     
  4. Camaro11

    Camaro11 Veteran Member

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    WWW.Mouser.com , WWW.DIGKEY.COM .

    Either one will be able to help you. Sounds like you are
    looking for a 10K ohm 10 Watt resistor. A picture would help.

    Bill
     
  5. angel71rs

    angel71rs Veteran Member

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    Sprague (company that's gone out of business) KoolOhm's (product line) were best known for being low inductance wire wound power resistors. Any time you wind a wire, you can get inductance, that's how they make inductors. But this was a bad characteristic for resistors used in certain circuits since it could affect the tuning of the circuit.

    Could be that type of resistor was used in there cause it's low induction characteristic was important. Or just because those were good, relatively inexpensive power resistors, low inductance of no consequence in that particular circuit. Any vacuum tubes in there?

    I don't think it's a 10 kilo ohm resistor. Only high voltage circuits would have need of a 10k power resistor. And the ohm symbol is next to the 135. 10kt might be the form factor.

    Why do you think it's bad, did you ohm it? Burn marks? If you see any scorching, check for shorts.

    You could try a 100 ohm 10 watt resistor wired in series with a 35 ohm 10 watt resistor and see what happens. If you let the smoke out, then I'd probably be wrong and you did need a 10k ohm resistor. :screwup:
     

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