Paint - in separate pieces or together?

Discussion in 'Body Restoration' started by TX79Z28, Jul 11, 2010.

  1. TX79Z28

    TX79Z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I will be painting my 79Z myself with an Axis Pro turbine sprayer, problem is that I am limited to my 2-car garage with all the tool boxes, cabinets, etc all around. So, space is at a premium, so I find myself with a big question as to how I will paint it. Right now, it's down to the bare body shell, no engine, no tranny, no rear end, no front end, and about to drop the front sub frame...so you get the picture! I know there are basically 2 schools of thought, some say that it's easier to fit all the panels, prime, and paint it. I also have heard that the best method is to paint all the pieces separate and then CAREFULY re-assemble. I am leaning towards the painting separate route, not only because it seems like it will be the most complete way, but because I think I can fit the body shell and all the other parts in the garage and paint all of them at once.

    I am looking for any advice, tips, recommendations, words of wisdom, etc. Not so much as to which method is best (results-wise) but what pros and cons there are to each method. I have thought A LOT about this, but I am sure I am missing key issues that might be relevant once I get started, things that I am sure have not even crossed my mind. BTW I am using a solid (dark blue) bc/cc, no metallic, no pearl, no candy

    Any input would be REALLY appreciated! thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2010
  2. blades67

    blades67 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    If you already have it in pieces, I think that will be the easiest way for you to go.
     
  3. TX79Z28

    TX79Z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    My actual plan was (after I finish all the welding of new floors, toe panels, smoothing out FW, etc) was:

    1. Prime/Paint underbody and Fire Wall, and then mask that.
    2. Prime/Paint interior/jambs of body shell, and inside panel of doors
    3. Install and fit doors (using 3M soft edge tape to seal jambs)
    4. BC/CC body shell (with doors on), and separately: Hood, bumpers, trunk lid, mirrors, scoop, fenders, etc
     
  4. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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  5. TX79Z28

    TX79Z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    The other question I have is this: Taking into consideration that I am using a solid color, IF I spray the misc. parts first (BC/CC) and a couple of days later I spray the body shell, what are my odds of having mis-match on the colors?
     
  6. 76_TypeLT

    76_TypeLT Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    If the color coat is from the same can, I'd say ~0% chance. Heck, if it's just from the same maker and is the same color, than probably still ~0%. Hardly anyone (average joes like us that is) can paint the entire car in one day. I know I will have to paint my car over several days.
     
  7. Personal_Aviator

    Personal_Aviator Veteran Member

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    I just finished mine on Saturday and I painted the mirrors, bumper trim pieces, fender extensions separate. Then I painted and cleared the door jambs and the insides of the doors off the car, assembled the doors and fenders, taped off the jambs and sprayed the rest of the car. I did this on the advice of a few on this board and it was good advice. Bear in mind I was using a pearl paint and it was said that spraying a pearl on different days, I could end up with different results. If I had to do it again, with a solid color, I'd probably still do it the same way though. Keep in mind this is the first time I've sprayed a car also so I was just as confused and had the same concerns as you. I painted mine in a single car garage and I know what you mean when you say space is at a premium. You can check my progress thread to see how I layed out the parts when I sprayed the epoxy primer and such. It may give you a few ideas. Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2010
  8. TX79Z28

    TX79Z28 Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Aviator, that was a great job on that car! congrats! I am so jealous! LOL

    A couple of questions:

    When you draped the plastic, was the PRIMARY reason to keep dust away from the area where you were spraying? or To protect all the stuff in the garage from overspray/paint dust?

    I know you shot the car with the fender and hood in place, but how long (time wise) was it from the time you shot the main car to the time you sprayed the "other parts"?
     
  9. Rich Schmidt

    Rich Schmidt Veteran Member

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    The factory did it as the bare body shell with the doors and trunk lid installed. Then they blacked out the firewall,then they applied any undercoating,trunk spatter,ect. Then the assembled the rest of the car except the front end sheetmetal which was painted seperate then bolted to the car.
    This way would work for you to.
     
  10. Personal_Aviator

    Personal_Aviator Veteran Member

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    I draped the plastic to keep dust away from the car. I did all my paint striping and some filler sanding with a DA sander and dust was everywhere, on the walls, ceiling everything so we cleaned it as best we could but figured the best thing to do was hang plastic. It worked out well. We were not worried about over spray on the other stuff in the garage. My buddy is going to paint the walls later anyway. Before painting we wet the floor with lots of water also to keep the over spray down and to prevent kicking up dust. It also helps with clean up after. The paint over spray tends to dry on the surface of the water then once the water evaporates you can just sweep most of the over spray up.

    I sprayed the other parts about a week before I sprayed the rest of the car. One tip I can give you if your doing the same sort of thing I did. If your getting everything ready to spray and if you think you will not have enough time to finish before the sun goes down then don't spray, wait until the next day. I found that as the sun went down the lights in the garage attracted every mosquito and black fly. Even though the doors were closed, and there were filters in the open windows, they still find a way in and like to land on the clear or paint or whatever.

    Good luck with yours and post pics!
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2010

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