Pex pipe?

Discussion in 'The BS Topic' started by JJFarmer, Nov 1, 2009.

  1. JJFarmer

    JJFarmer Veteran Member

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    I need to replace the galvanized pipe in the house. Starting to get pin hole leaks on the hot and man, it is really corroded inside. Anyhow, I'm looking at the options for replacement.

    No copper so it's pex or PVC/CPVC.

    I know nothing about the Pex but watched some good video on YouTube about it. Looks like it would go in fast, lots of options for types of fittings.

    Anybody have any experience with it...opinions... recommendations?

    Jim? anybody?
     
  2. tom3

    tom3 Veteran Member

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    Expensive stuff with the fittings and all. Special sizes, won't interchange with other stuff unless you use the 0-ring outside sealing connectors, not sure it will interchange even then. I'd go with regular old copper or glued PVC and keep it simple.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2009
  3. JOHNNYMO

    JOHNNYMO Veteran Member

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  4. gary 80z

    gary 80z Veteran Member

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    I have been a plumber since 1987. I would not use either in my house. O-rings and glue joints fail over time. Do it in copper and do it just once. Copper will usually out last the house. Just my opinion.
     
  5. sniggle_t

    sniggle_t Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I used pex at a friends camp this summer. Fast and easy. I liked it so much I'm going to re-ro my house with it to replace the old galvanized pipes.
     
  6. patgizz

    patgizz Moderator Lifetime Gold Member

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    i've been a contractor and doing plumbing work since 96, i'm up in the air with PEX in the walls. i'd never put it in my own home nor would i use it in a customers home. it's the "holy crap this stuff is amazing use it everywhere" product right now, but thats what they said about the grey polybutylene flexible pipe years ago and i've repaired several failures in sub 20 year old homes that have that running through the walls.

    CPVC is not the way to go either. i've used it, mostly in rental properties or flips where the owner is too cheap to get copper. my dad used some in his basement and after 10 years it became extremely brittle and began to crumble. i took it all out and did copper.

    sure it requires more work, but IMHO it is the only way to build a water system that will last. once your joint is sweated and you pressure test the system and get no leaks you're done pretty much forever.

    can a mouse chew through pex?
     
  7. MrAzzhat2U

    MrAzzhat2U Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    It's suppose to be rodent proof,but it's not.I agree with Pat,I wouldn't use it where you have no access.I guess it would be OK in the basement where it would be open.

    Also,if you don't use the proper crimping tool,the joints tend to seep after a few years.

    I only know this because my daughters house is done in pex and all these problems are starting to surface now(5yrs later)!
     
  8. GetMore

    GetMore Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    One thing that I'd heard about and liked the idea of with PEX was running a header manifold with shutoffs and individual lines to each fixture.
    A sink or toilet does not need much water, so you could run lines even smaller than 1/2" (3/8", I think), while you would run 1/2" to a tub. If there is a problem at a fixture you can turn off the water to that fixture without affecting anything else. Plus, since you can run smaller lines you will have less water sitting in those lines, so you can get hot water to a fixture quicker.

    However, I have no experience actually working with PEX. Everything I ever worked on was copper. For DWV piping I have used PVC, ABS, copper and cast iron, but never anything unusual for potable water lines.
     
  9. rscamaro73

    rscamaro73 Administrator Staff Member

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    I ran cvpv to replace some nasty 80+yo galv pipe in the old place. It was 1' black pipe, but the inside wasn't 1/4". You'd flush the toilet and lose almost all water to the kitchen sink.

    Replaced most of it (up to the water meter and what when thru the wall to the street) with cpvc....afterwards I could shower AND do dishes. Amazing what new pipes will do.

    I agree copper is the 'long time, problem free' cure. But if you don't plan on being there for long....or need a 'cheap fix' for now....cpvc.

    Not to be confused with pvc....lol. Like I did. And have to redo it all. :rolleyes:

    lol
     
  10. MadMike

    MadMike Administrator Staff Member

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    Mr. Stokkeland (our resident plumber & coffee dude) helped me replace that ticking time-bomb gray stuff with PEX. I asked about copper but apparently it wouldn't have been practical. So we replumbed 90% of the house with PEX.

    I had sprung 2 separate pin-hole leaks with the gray stuff. I have shutoffs plumbed into the PEX to isolate areas of my plumbing system now. Primarily my upstairs which is behind a wall. If I have a problem, I have a zone shutoff and can kill the 2nd story (my kids bathroom). The failure areas (crimps & joints) of the gray stuff are basically all gone. Eventually, I will replace individual connections, where PEX meets the original gray crap going to a toilet or sink fitting through the floor. I'll either run braided hose or PEX up through the floor.

    Here's some visuals:
    BEFORE:
    [​IMG]

    AFTER
    [​IMG]

    This is the junk that was replaced
    [​IMG]

    Here's the connection to my water heater (before)
    [​IMG]

    After
    [​IMG]
     

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