Repair Drivers Side brake line.

Quazit

Veteran Member
Gold Member
Feb 23, 2021
396
Dallas, North Carolina
Generally installing quality stainless hoses has a big impact on brake pedal feel, they don't expand under pressure like the rubber hoses do. I have a homemade pressure bleeder that I attach over the MC. Just a plate with an air fitting and a rubber gasket. Need to be careful though not to run the fluid out of the rear chamber, the front not so bad as it is bigger. Use no more pressure than required to flow fluid, also this eliminates bench bleeding the MC.
The beer method is more fun but my preference is Canadian Mist.

rotin
I would like to see what this looks like.
 

Quazit

Veteran Member
Gold Member
Feb 23, 2021
396
Dallas, North Carolina

rocket dawg

Veteran Member
May 5, 2015
566
Grand Rapids Mi
Camaro and Firebird take the same kit. I have a 79 T/A and I used all 3 of them. Now dont take my word for the correct part number posted. It's been a few years and the Summit link was going off memory. The OEM flex lines would expand instead of allowing all the fluid to the calipers or drums in the rear. Stiff pedal but braking effect was not so good. Once all the lines were replaced (flex and hard lines) the car stopped on a dime and gave me 9 cents change. I did put a new Master cylinder on and new rotors and pads. I didn't go with ceramic pads, I use semi metallic. (AC Delco pads) Slotted rotors also. Rear drums were in very good condition so I left them alone. 100% of the fluid changed as well.
 

Roadkingbill

New Member
May 5, 2018
11
Hello, Back in December I purchased a 1971 Base Camaro 350 and the brakes needed a complete overhaul. The car had manual brakes with disks up front and drums in the rear. I upgraded to power brakes and installed a booster. I ordered this kit from inline: CC B7101 1971-73 Chevrolet Camaro Power Disc Complete Brake Line Kit 7pc, OE Steel. If at all possible put the car on a lift! I used jack stands and the line you are referring too is close to 10 feet long and it is a complete horror show dealing with by yourself. First step is to CAREFULLY remove the OEM line from the car and sent it on the ground and CAP the ends or you will get brake fluid all over you and everything else!! That long line has several ounces of fluid and it is nasty. I used pig blankets everywhere...part of the job. The new lines you get from inline comes in a 5 foot box two of the lines come bent for shipping. The main line front to rear and the one that goes next to the front cross member. The front lines are a breeze except if the flare nuts are rust frozen. Good grief... Anyway the most important thing I can tell you is to save the old tubes and use as a reference to bend the new tubes back into the correct orientation. Inline sends a picture of the bent tube and where to unbend but the new tube is CLOSE but not exact. I do believe these lines were ADJUSTED at the assembly line to fit :). This is what I did. Like I said I used the old line as a template for the new line. I used zip ties every 6 inches and attach the lines together and bent the new line to match the bends of the old. That line is bent like a corkscrew but it fits with a lot of swearing so empty the house. On jack stands I slid the line to the rear then snaked the line back up to the front past the master cylinder. Doing this allowed me to get it up to the top of the differential area. That is the hardest connection to make because you are on your back and trying to reach that area with the rearend in the way. All I can say is don't get too frustrated. I walked away and went to a safe zone and screamed. Did not help. In all seriousness if you can find a lift and a friend to help you with this long line you will be OK. It gets caught on everything and you are pulling and tugging it. What the hell is it caught on! Inline makes a quality line but that long line is bent in two places and it is also twisted to fit in the box use the old line as template..trust me!






Thanks for the advice. I just received my kit from In-line tube yesterday. I don’t have the old line. My car was a frame off restoration project that came without brakes. Wish me luck.
 

rotinrob

Veteran Member
Oct 2, 2018
273
The lines pretty much fall into place except on the plumbers nightmare that is a 1970. Anyway an assembly manual has nice illustrations in it that shows how and where to put the lines. Also gives torque specs.

Quazit: I am nowhere near my shop to take a picture of my homemade brake bleeder if that is what you are asking about. But it is literally a flat plate that covers the master cylinder with an air spud and a rubber gasket.

rotin
 

Quazit

Veteran Member
Gold Member
Feb 23, 2021
396
Dallas, North Carolina
So, I received the Inline Rear brake lines that go over the axle. Just so you know, the passenger side line is too long and the drivers side is too short for the 77 LT. I Also bought the center line connected over the axle, and its perfect, but since that mount for it is welded to the axle, both of the lines are the wrong length.

They work, but the Drivers side wont be long enough to go back in the original clips.
 

rocket dawg

Veteran Member
May 5, 2015
566
Grand Rapids Mi
Make a small extension for the welded on bracket. GM did weld them on in various places. Mine was perfect. If you have access to a welder, cut the bracket off and relocate it. Otherwise a call to them will get ya straightened out.
 




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