Residential Geothermal Heat and AC Questions

Flynt

Veteran Member
Jul 9, 2003
871
Alabama, USA
At some point in the future I will need to replace my two Carrier units that were manufactured in 1989. I am thinking about geothermal or a dual fuel heat pump.

I did some research and found a thread from four years ago about geothermal.

Any updates? Anyone have a geothermal unit for their home? What brand? I would thinking about Waterfurnace brand. Any thoughts or ideas?

http://www.waterfurnace.com/
 
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Todd80Z28

Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Gold Member
Jun 11, 2002
11,916
Northern VA
Why would you need a dual fuel heat pump to go along with geothermal?

Around here, $25-30k is the starting point for geothermal... which is why I opted out.:screwup:
 

Flynt

Veteran Member
Jul 9, 2003
871
Alabama, USA
Typo

Todd80Z28 said:
Why would you need a dual fuel heat pump to go along with geothermal?

Around here, $25-30k is the starting point for geothermal... which is why I opted out.:screwup:

I had a typo. I am considering a geothermal and a conventional dual fuel heat pump but not both. The geothermal is out of consideration if it cost anywhere near $25,000 to $30,000!!:eek: :eek:
 

Flynt

Veteran Member
Jul 9, 2003
871
Alabama, USA
Your System

BB72R-Yes said:
Why? Do you mean for the initial filling?My system is a closed loop. Aren't they all?

Tell me about your system. How long have you had it and what brand do you have?
 

Todd80Z28

Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Gold Member
Jun 11, 2002
11,916
Northern VA
Flynt said:
I had a typo. I am considering a geothermal and a conventional dual fuel heat pump but not both. The geothermal is out of consideration if it cost anywhere near $25,000 to $30,000!!:eek: :eek:
Make some phone calls, but yeah, I was basically shocked. A big part of that was the drilling of vertical wells (holes, really) to put the loops into, but the system itself was pretty money, too.

Need a lot more players in this game to get some economy of scale and bring the price down. Right now, many in the efficiency niche are pocketing every single penny you'd save over the life of the unit, and more, on the initial cost of the unit.

Found this- http://www.geothermalgenius.org/thi...tallation-by-the-numbers-in-pennsylvania.html

For $18k, I would have probably done it. $33k was my average quote- I couldn't even calc a payback at that cost.:eek:
 
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hhott71

R.I.P 11/19/18
Lifetime Gold Member
Mar 30, 2001
14,377
Joplin Mo. 64801
If you have sufficient land you can bury the condoner loops.
If you have a deep pond you can submerge the loops. (cheapest)
Or you sink wells that use the ground water to remove (add) heat.

The ground is a constant 58*, Great for taking away summer heat and plenty warm to take that heat back into the house.

Running water isn't needed.
 

tom3

Veteran Member
Aug 1, 1999
14,236
ohio
Although keep in mind that pumping water from the wells will cost some money in electric, depending on depth etc. How many square feet are you cooling/heating? Cold in Alabama? Surely not.....
 

DCR 1979 Z28

Veteran Member
Mar 26, 2002
883
Webb City, MO, USA
My parents put one in a house we had in the country back in the early '80s. it was an open loop system, pump and dump, it had a 1,000 foot well.

I put one in my house in 2010 a closed system 3 330 foot wells to loop the lines through and Climate Master 27 unit. If you shop around you will find a wide range of quotes some of mine where as high as $35,000 I went with a company out of Joplin Lyrerla sheet metal. They had done many and only quoted me $20,000.

Somethings to keep in mind when comparing them to other systems, right now until 2016, I believe, you get a 30% tax rebate from the government, so mine only cost $14,000, which was only $4,000 more than a high end air to air heat pump. Also it appears they last many times longer than a regular heat pump. I was told by the company that installed my original heat pump not to expect more than about 8-10 years out of a new heat pump before it started leaking refrigerant, he said that to make new units more efficient they where using thinner tubing in the coils, my last system only lasted about 10 years before this happened. I did research on the life of geothermal heat pumps and found that they are not sure how long they last because many of the ones installed in the seventies where still going, so if mine last 20 years it will be cheaper than air to air would have been. The field is where at least half the money is and it last basically forever.

Now for the but. After having both air to air and a geothermal in the same house don't expect the saving they claim. I personally feel that during the times of year when it's not that cold or hot it cost more to operate than the old system, but when it gets really cold it is way cheaper I would say as much a $100 a month cheaper. Other things I really like not having that noisy unit outside. It's very quiet and the house is more comfortable in the winter time the heat is more like gas it's quite toasty. In the summer time it's cooler we use to set our thermostat at 69 in the summer now we are comfortable at 71.

Because of the cost I wouldn't consider one unless your were certain you were going to stay in the house forever. I would also be concerned that your climate is to warm to save you any money, because in my experience in a large house with excellent insulation the only real savings is in the cold part of the winter. All that being said I love mine and don't regret it.
 
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