Severe Duty Fan Clutch

Discussion in 'Engine Topic' started by BlueBaron762x39, Jul 3, 2020.

  1. BlueBaron762x39

    BlueBaron762x39 Veteran Member

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    My car is stock. The radiator is a new copper brass 3 core, original fan shroud is installed, 180 degree Oreilly Auto parts thermostat. I installed a Murray severe duty fan clutch from Oreilly Auto. The car is still heating up to 220 when the AC is turned on even with all this. I'm not sure what else would be left to replace at this point.
     
  2. BlueBaron762x39

    BlueBaron762x39 Veteran Member

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    The car is stock with a new copper brass 3 core radiator. I installed an Oreilly Auto Parts Murray severe duty fan clutch for a 1979 Chevrolet truck (Oreilly didn't have one listed for a Camaro, only standard and heavy duty) and a Oreilly Auto Parts 180 degree thermostat. The car has a new flowkooler water pump. Despite all this the temperature rises to 220 when I turn on the AC. I have not yet run it long enough with the AC on to see if it will rise higher. I'm not sure what is left to replace at this point, the entire cooling system is new.
     
  3. Burd

    Burd Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    I use a 160° thermo, on a Pontiac, you need to dial in the plate behind the water pump, I don’t think Chevy has that, also, the stock cast iron impellers are best, the steel replacements the rebuilders put in are junk. You also need to test your cap, A lot of new ones are bad out of the box. A rad cap tester is pretty cheap.
    The 301 pump looks the same but it’s not. It’s smaller on the inside. Don’t use one on a 400-455.
     
  4. 450bench

    450bench Veteran Member

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    I agree with the 160 degree thermostat. Personally, I always run a 160 degree thermostat with 2 3/32 holes in it. Seems to warm up slower and stay between 160-180 even in 100 degree summer heat.
     
  5. BlueBaron762x39

    BlueBaron762x39 Veteran Member

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    I guess I could try the 160 degree thermostat then if that's what is working for most of you. That seems really low to compared to the stock 195 degree though.
     
  6. BlueBaron762x39

    BlueBaron762x39 Veteran Member

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    I tried the 160 thermostat but the car still overheats when the air conditioning is turned on. The AC system is the original system that was converted to r134a. A local mechanic here thinks the dealership may have overcharged the AC system causing it to overheat when it's on. The vehicle overheats both at idle and on the highway when AC is on. Will an overcharged AC system overheat a car that quickly?
     
  7. 79ZED

    79ZED Veteran Member

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    When you switched over to R134A did you change the condenser over to a modern parallel flow? If you're still using the original condenser it may need to have the fins cleaned out. It will collect a lot debris and bugs over the years, severely limiting the flow of air for the radiator.

    John
     
  8. BlueBaron762x39

    BlueBaron762x39 Veteran Member

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    The condenser is still the original condenser. I'll look into cleaning it or maybe even just replacing it to see if that helps.
     

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