Spot-welding prep on new AMD panels with EDP coating

Discussion in 'Body Restoration' started by lapedr, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. lapedr

    lapedr Veteran Member Gold Member

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    I have a question about the EDP finish on AMD panels when it comes to spot-welding. I am getting ready to install the outer wheelhouse, trunk drop off, and quarter panel to my 72 Camaro. This is my first job of this size, and I want to do it right. The question I have is do I need to remove the EDP finish on the new panels where I plan to drill out holes for the spot welds, or can I leave the finish on? The finish is EDP (Electro Deposit Coating) coated for corrosion protection.
     
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  2. bodymanbill

    bodymanbill Veteran Member

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    Yes u want to remove the EDP coatings anywhere u r going to weld. The best way is to remove it on all mating surfaces then spray those with a weld thru primer. When ur finished welding get a cavity wax and spray all your mating surfaces with it , fill them up all u can and just let it run out the bottoms
     
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  3. 70lt1z28

    70lt1z28 Veteran Member Gold Member

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    Can a good epoxy primer be used instead of the cavity wax?
     
  4. bodymanbill

    bodymanbill Veteran Member

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    image.jpg I guess it could, the cavity wax seems to seep in there better and u can get different hoses and tips for it to get in hard to reach places. The cavity wax can wash out easier over time though were the epoxy will not if u can get it in there. Heres a nice end that works good for feeding into panels and coating all sides
     
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  5. lapedr

    lapedr Veteran Member Gold Member

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    Great info
     
  6. 70lt1z28

    70lt1z28 Veteran Member Gold Member

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    You may have to really thin the epoxy to get it to flow. I was thinking you can put it in a pump can similar to the old time oilers and squirt it in the crevices.
     
  7. GoldenOne7710

    GoldenOne7710 Equal Opportunity Offender Lifetime Gold Member

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    This is what I used. Sprayed it in every crevice I could get to. As stated, it will creep and set up, locking out any moisture or other contaminants.
     

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  8. MotionClone

    MotionClone Veteran Member

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    Get rid of ALL the EDP coating on repop panels . Its applied poorly and there is rust under that black coating in some places. There was on mine and others here have had similar experience. I glass blasted and epoxy coated all my stuff before installing.
     
  9. Scott51

    Scott51 Veteran Member

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    Yep this, all of the coatings I’ve seen on repop panels have been pretty garbage and could only be considered a holding primer at best.

    Though you could probably get away with leaving it on interior surfaces followed by a coat of cavity wax, no way would I be using it as the foundation for new paint on the outside
     
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  10. xten

    xten Veteran Member

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    Also, the metal has to be ground clean on the surface below the plug welds, the metal you're welding to. Some metal has a galvanized coating which must come off. Not only does that affect penetration and surface adhesion, but the fumes galvanized puts off are not good for you at all. You can tell if it has the coating if you grind and it doesn't spark right away and there are two different colors of silver metal on the surface. Just a precaution.
     
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