Stucco House-Pros and Cons

Discussion in 'The BS Topic' started by 71camaro383, Sep 13, 2010.

  1. 71camaro383

    71camaro383 Veteran Member

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    We looked at a stucco house tonight for sale.Its two years old. I know nothing about stucco and do not know anyone who has a stucco house to ask them about it. For those that do, what is your opinion and would you buy another one? Have you had any cracking, etc and how was the repair?How about color fade? Thanks for the replies.
     
  2. Earlsfat

    Earlsfat Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Uh... my grandparents had stucco applied to their (brick) house about 25 years ago. They never had a problem with it... they haven't owned it for about 10-15 years and it still looks good. They had it tinted a baby blur... and the neat part is when it gets wets turns a darker shade until it dries out again.
     
  3. High Country Z

    High Country Z Veteran Member

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    I had one for 17 years, pretty much maintenance free. I guess it just depends on the quality of the workmanship, whether it's hassle free or not, like anything else.
     
  4. JOHNNYMO

    JOHNNYMO Veteran Member

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    Most new homes are done in stucco on the western side of the country. The process to apply stucco is as follows. First the house is wrapped in a light felt paper similar to roofing felt. Next, the felt is covered in chicken wire in order to give the next step something to adhere to. Now that the chicken wire is in place, the house is whats called "brown coated". Its actually gray in color, but none the less its a brown coat. The brown coat covers the chicken wire and gives the next step a place to adhere to. Now, the color coat is applied. Color is added to the cement/sand mixture so its color comepletely through to the brown coat. The color coat is skip troweled on most of the time to create a nice texture. Thats pretty much it. The key to a quality job is not to apply it in freezing temperatures and in regular temperatures it need to be kept moist by hosing it down with a garden hose maybe once or twice while its in the drying process. This is for the brown coat step. Small hairline crcks here and there are completely normal. If you can fit the tip of a ballpoint pen in the crack, its too much. Me myself, I would never buy a house again that wasnt stucco'd. Never needs paint, never needs anything...
    :bowtie:
     
  5. Toy71Camaro

    Toy71Camaro Veteran Member

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    Almost all the houses out here are Stucco'd... Only way I'd do it. Virtually maintenance free.
     
  6. SG71SS

    SG71SS Veteran Member

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    Same here in So Cal. Virtually all houses exteriors are either all or just about all stucco with some having siding or bickwork accents.

    My house was built in 1955 and is completely stucco. It lasts forever. Usually when people paint over it the paint will fail over time but the original color coat of the stucco is still there.
     
  7. 72350RS

    72350RS Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    Some houses may be advertised as stucco, and are actually Dryvit.

    Not that there's anything wrong with dryvit, if it is applied properly (speaking from experience).

    Depending upon the extremes in climate you encounter, Drvit is actually more flexible and less prone to cracking.

    Anyhow. stucco is great stuff.

    Good luck.
     
  8. gordonquixote

    gordonquixote Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    ^ yeah, is it cemetitious stucco applied over masonry or Dryvit (synthetic lightweight) applied over foam or gyp board?

    My house was built in '56 and the cement stucco still looks new.
     
  9. jayb53guy

    jayb53guy Veteran Member Gold Member

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    My last house was stucco and I never had any problems, just had to pressure wash it once a year. The stuff is real easy to repair, too.
     
  10. flowjoe

    flowjoe Moderator Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    there are actually three coats - a scratch coat, thinnish and roughly applied over the lathe. a brown coat - thickly applied, and a color coat thinnly applied in the manner noted above.

    My house is older (1940 for the oldest portion) and has been remodeled and added onto almost every decade since. The oldest stucco is still as hard and functional as the newest stuff. I'm not sure how it would do in cold climates (like back home in AK) or very wet but here in CA it does fine and I would guess that OK would do well too.
     

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