Tranny cooler- hoakie line connections

Discussion in 'Transmission & Driveline Topics' started by need-for-speed, Nov 4, 2014.

  1. need-for-speed

    need-for-speed Veteran Member

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    I installed a tranny cooler 20 years ago. It uses the crappy "rubber hose slid over the original metal line with hose clamp" connections. Is there a "more better" solution now ?
     
  2. DFWJ

    DFWJ Veteran Member

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    Are there threaded fittings on the trans cooler side?


    Jiffy-tite makes some nice stuff, if you don't mind making your own lines. They have adaptor fittings to fit in to the trans and most common NPT and AN sizes. Makes it really easy to connect and disconnect for frequent trans/cooler removal.

    jiffy-tite

    trans kit
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2014
  3. markw

    markw Veteran Member

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    How's it been working for the last 20 years? If it hasn't blown off yet maybe it's not so 'crappy". You can always spend more money for a better looking solution if that's what you mean. Just make sure whatever hose you use is safe for trans fluid. I've had brand new pickups with a trailer towing option that used rubber hose clamped over a metal line to get to an auxiliary cooler. The key is the right size flare in the tube.
     
  4. need-for-speed

    need-for-speed Veteran Member

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    The cooler has straight tubing that you slip the rubber hose over. Not so much of a problem there. The other end of the rubber hose slips on the OEM steel line, on the flared end that used to connect into the radiator tranny cooler.

    Thanks for the tip. I'll check out jiffy-tite.
     
  5. need-for-speed

    need-for-speed Veteran Member

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    It hasn't blown off, but high pressure tranny fluid and worm gear hose clamps are going to leak eventually. Mine does. That's that I would like to eliminate.

    Do you know if "fuel line" rubber hose is ok for tranny fluid?
     
  6. night rider

    night rider Veteran Member

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    No, fuel line is not ok for transmission use. The transmission line is rated at many times more pressure than fuel.

    Your trans works at 130 to 200 psi IIRC,
    fuel at 6 psi for carb, 40 psi for TBI.

    They make rubber transmission cooler line
     
  7. need-for-speed

    need-for-speed Veteran Member

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    Thanks night rider. That makes sense.
     
  8. Dogwater

    Dogwater Veteran Member

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    130 to 200 psi is what the torque converter spits out but the pump only does around 30 psi, it circulates fluid to the cooler. You can use power steering return line hose, 3/8's. I've been using the higher grade fuel line 30R9 but only in short lengths with no problems so far but I need to change to the p/s return line hose.
     
  9. Rich Schmidt

    Rich Schmidt Veteran Member

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    I use high grade fuel line,and use solid steel tube right up to the cooler with just a few inches of rubber hose. I use new tubing with no flare,but you can just cut the flare off your existing tubes. I use yellow snot glue on the trans cooler barbs,and the steel tube. I make the rubber hose so that it slides about 3" onto the steel tube and use one clamp at about 1" behind where the tube ends inside the hose,and the second clamp at the very end of the hose. I also try and push the tube so that there is only about 3" between the steel tube and the cooler barb. Don't go too close here because if you butt them together,the rubber hose will take a beating if there is any misalignment between the steel tube and the barb. Also DO NOT use braided hose with hose clamps. Braid hose is difficult to compress,and even if you crank the heck out of the clamps,chances are the hose wont be very tight on the tube. I ran the same rubber hose on my race car for over 15 years with no issues. Even when I had to swap out the front subframe,I left the cooler hooked up and tie strapped it to the front of the engine. Why tamper with perfection? BTW,the only time I see trans lines blow out is when guys run braided hose with all the fancy hose ends. I don't know why,but they seem to work worse then rubber hose.
     
  10. BondoSpecial

    BondoSpecial Veteran Member Lifetime Gold Member

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    You could put a tubing nut on the existing steel line and flare it, and attach it to a flare to barb conversion fitting, so that you have a real barb fitting to attach high pressure trans cooler hose to. Or use one of the compression to NPT or compression to AN type fittings on the existing steel line, and then get a conversion fitting that goes to a barb. These options are probably overkill, but a real barb fitting is a better option than double clamping hose over smooth steel line. If you've ever tried pulling hose off a barbed fitting vs pulling hose off a smooth steel line, you know what I mean. A barb alone with no hose clamp is most of the retention already (actually push-lok hose and fittings exist where you don't even need clamps)
     

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