Welding Sheet Metal Help

70lt1z28

Veteran Member
Gold Member
Oct 3, 1999
4,766
Beavercreek, Ohio, USA
The way I would approach it is to measure the current cutout on the original fender and add about a half inch to each edge. An easy way to do this is to take a piece of cardboard, hold it under the opening and trace it. Then, measure about a half inch beyond these edges and add some lines. Then lay this pattern in as close to the same position as possible cut this out of the donor fender. Now you have a part that has the same curves and bends as the original, but just a bit bigger. Now you can hold this up under the original fender cutout and move it around until it is in the exact correct position. Once there, you can with a metal scriber trace the opening exactly. Carefully trim this to size and it should be ready to tack weld into position for a trial. If good, then finish the weld by hitting a spot randomly to keep it cool until it is fully welded.

This process should work unless the cutout opening is really bent out of its original shape, which is possible if whoever cut it didn't care.

As far as using the rusted fender, I've seen worse used. I would blast it clean (be gentle but get all the rust off). Then if it only has random small holes you may be better off fixing it by filling the holes and epoxy priming. then move to a high build primer and block it smooth. It's a tough call for sure. If your original is really good other than the cutout, you are probably correct to try and fix it.
 

hubedobeedo

3rd times a charm
Jul 18, 2013
856
Huntertown,IN
The way I would approach it is to measure the current cutout on the original fender and add about a half inch to each edge. An easy way to do this is to take a piece of cardboard, hold it under the opening and trace it. Then, measure about a half inch beyond these edges and add some lines. Then lay this pattern in as close to the same position as possible cut this out of the donor fender. Now you have a part that has the same curves and bends as the original, but just a bit bigger. Now you can hold this up under the original fender cutout and move it around until it is in the exact correct position. Once there, you can with a metal scriber trace the opening exactly. Carefully trim this to size and it should be ready to tack weld into position for a trial. If good, then finish the weld by hitting a spot randomly to keep it cool until it is fully welded.

This process should work unless the cutout opening is really bent out of its original shape, which is possible if whoever cut it didn't care.

As far as using the rusted fender, I've seen worse used. I would blast it clean (be gentle but get all the rust off). Then if it only has random small holes you may be better off fixing it by filling the holes and epoxy priming. then move to a high build primer and block it smooth. It's a tough call for sure. If your original is really good other than the cutout, you are probably correct to try and fix it.
i reworked mine ,i actually did not want the front area were battery, and charcoal canister went .i straightened and welded holes i did not want , sand blasted epoxied and used a fill primer blocked and reprimed and prep and refinished . the tire side i used a urethane stone guard before paint.
 

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badazz81z28

Veteran Member
May 4, 2001
21,918
Alabama
I’ll post more pics for fun. It’s really hard to get a true assessment of the donor fender. It would need it’s fair share of work too and it would be much better uglier.
 

firefighter_11

Veteran Member
Mar 12, 2018
132
NC
I guess you missed the boat, first of all, the reproduction inner fenders fit like crap. Secondly, this fender is a one year only, and only the first half of the production year piece. Very rare and valuable.
What boat did i miss and where did you say anything about repo fitting like crap?
You certainly come off like a jerk..
 

COPO

Veteran Member
Lifetime Gold Member
Sep 15, 1999
21,671
Ontario, Canada
All aftermarket metal panels both inner and outer fit like crap including upper and lower dashes and end air vent pieces.
I would fix the originals any day before buying sh!t.
I was lucky when my car was done in 1985. All panels were still available at your local Chevy Parts Dept. Whoever thinks aftermarket is great, just has no clue.
 

badazz81z28

Veteran Member
May 4, 2001
21,918
Alabama
What boat did i miss and where did you say anything about repo fitting like crap?
You certainly come off like a jerk..

Because instead of adding value to the post, you decided to criticize why someone wouldn’t just buy a repop. If I wanted a repop, I would have done that. Years of experience and research drove me to want to fix this 70 only inner fender.
 




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