working on cars in winter and heated shop..what to do about the moisture on the cars?

Discussion in 'The BS Topic' started by 1971CamaroGuy, Dec 17, 2018.

  1. 1971CamaroGuy

    1971CamaroGuy LS Swapped 1971 Camaro

    Messages:
    3,819
    Likes Received:
    191
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    I have a small shop I keep my 71 in and it came with a ventless space heater with natural gas. We get pretty cold winters and sometimes it drops down to 10-18 degrees on average during the worst of it. But usually stays around 25-32 degrees for the most part.

    But one thing that annoys me, is when i fire up the heat in my shop to mess with the car.....the car develops wet condensation on the metal parts on the engine and chassis. This causes certain parts to get premature rusting or the aluminum parts to get chalky.

    I know this is because of the change in air temp versus the actual temp of the metal at a rapid pace.

    But short of having a 24/7 climate controlled shop or moving to a state that doesn't have these kind of winters is there anything else I can do it prevent this? Maybe some sort of air conditioner to take the humidity out?
     
  2. Chevrolaine

    Chevrolaine Veteran Member Gold Member

    Messages:
    3,368
    Likes Received:
    194
    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2007
    Location:
    Various barns in N. IL looking for chit.
    I put a simple box fan on the ground in front of the car that seemed to help quite a bit. Left it on 24/7 all winter long. Keeps the air moving and dries things out quicker.
     
    budro6968 likes this.
  3. 1971CamaroGuy

    1971CamaroGuy LS Swapped 1971 Camaro

    Messages:
    3,819
    Likes Received:
    191
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    I didn't think of that, I actually have a high velocity shop fan for drying floors and stuff. I might try that next time I turn the heat on in my shop..I can put it under the car and angle it up..at least while it's on jackstands

    Thanks for the tip
     
  4. 70lt1z28

    70lt1z28 Veteran Member Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,103
    Likes Received:
    932
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 1999
    Location:
    Beavercreek, Ohio, USA
    The reason why you are seening the moisture is the ventless NG heaters put a bunch of water in the air. Did you ever notice in cold weather with a vented heater the fog coming out of the vent? That is what you are filling your garage with. I had a ventless and when I ran it the humidity shot up to 100%. I changed to a 80% efficiency ceiling mounted unit and now the humidity drops when it is running. I can leave bare metal out with zero flash rust problems. Get rid of that heater.

    Also do not buy too large of a heater. It should cycle about 10 minutes per hour average to keep the humidity down. This will of course vary depending on how well your garage is insulated and the outside temperature
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2018
  5. 1971CamaroGuy

    1971CamaroGuy LS Swapped 1971 Camaro

    Messages:
    3,819
    Likes Received:
    191
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Ah ok....I have a 220 volt ceiling mount forced air electrical heater I brought from my old home I never hooked up...it would be a good time now. It worked pretty good in my old shop building, just never thought of it.
     
  6. 70-camaro

    70-camaro Veteran Member

    Messages:
    3,168
    Likes Received:
    1,419
    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Location:
    marietta ohio
    And run the box fan all winter. That is what I do also. I run mine year round.
     
  7. Todd80Z28

    Todd80Z28 Moderator Staff Member Lifetime Gold Member

    Messages:
    11,855
    Likes Received:
    423
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2002
    Location:
    Northern VA
    Yep.

    CH4 +2(O2) = CO2 + 2(H2O)

    My neighbor had one of those that he used to run in his house all the time- he built a custom freestanding fireplace. I always wondered what the peak CO2 concentration got to.
     
  8. ssupercoolss

    ssupercoolss Veteran Member

    Messages:
    963
    Likes Received:
    319
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2015
    Location:
    PA
    I have one of those in my weekend place, so i can attest to them raising the humidity. I use it for a few minutes when i first get there to get the heat up quick, but other than that, its a back up unit in case i lose electric, which happens kinda often.
     
  9. 351maverick

    351maverick full time Ebay seller/hustler/car killer

    Messages:
    3,829
    Likes Received:
    542
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2010
    Location:
    erie, PA
    gas ventless heaters SUCK

    I had to run a dehumidifier 24/7 all winter to even half eliminate the moisture from a 30k btu natural gas ventless wall heater

    I went with a forced air furnace this year...perfect humidity now, nice & dry
     
  10. The Champ

    The Champ Veteran Member

    Messages:
    5,285
    Likes Received:
    986
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2000
    Location:
    MN
    Sell the ventless gas unit and eliminate that problem ASAP.

    Decide how much you want to spend to put dry heat into your shop. If it's powered by oil, LP or natural gas - it needs to be vented. If you go electric, no venting needed.

    How big is your shop? Is it insulated?

    It may not take a real expensive heater to produce a satisfactory level of heat.

    My shop is 1200 sq ft, has R19 in the walls and R38 in the ceiling. I have an 80,000 btu infrared ceiling unit that can easily get totally dry heat in my shop even when it's -30 degrees Fahrenheit. It doesn't take up any floor space and is very efficient.

    One of the things I love about this unit is that in the spring when all the snow is melting/has melted and condensation becomes an issue - I can turn on my heat and eliminate it. Garage 4.jpg
     

Share This Page